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      The RIDDLE Syndrome Protein Mediates a Ubiquitin-Dependent Signaling Cascade at Sites of DNA Damage

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          Abstract

          The biological response to DNA double-strand breaks acts to preserve genome integrity. Individuals bearing inactivating mutations in components of this response exhibit clinical symptoms that include cellular radiosensitivity, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. The archetype for such disorders is Ataxia-Telangiectasia caused by biallelic mutation in ATM, a central component of the DNA damage response. Here, we report that the ubiquitin ligase RNF168 is mutated in the RIDDLE syndrome, a recently discovered immunodeficiency and radiosensitivity disorder. We show that RNF168 is recruited to sites of DNA damage by binding to ubiquitylated histone H2A. RNF168 acts with UBC13 to amplify the RNF8-dependent histone ubiquitylation by targeting H2A-type histones and by promoting the formation of lysine 63-linked ubiquitin conjugates. These RNF168-dependent chromatin modifications orchestrate the accumulation of 53BP1 and BRCA1 to DNA lesions, and their loss is the likely cause of the cellular and developmental phenotypes associated with RIDDLE syndrome.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Cell
          Cell
          Elsevier BV
          00928674
          February 2009
          February 2009
          : 136
          : 3
          : 420-434
          Article
          10.1016/j.cell.2008.12.042
          19203578
          584b8bfa-562e-48b6-bdbb-b2f7bb22d618
          © 2009

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

          https://www.elsevier.com/open-access/userlicense/1.0/

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