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      TAKING THE “LEED” IN INDOOR AIR QUALITY: DOES CERTIFICATION RESULT IN HEALTHIER BUILDINGS?

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          ABSTRACT

          Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has been an area of growing concern with the increasing knowledge of health hazards associated with contaminants, particularly in high occupancy buildings where residents may be exposed to high levels of nuisance dust and other contaminants. Leadership and Energy in Environmental Design (LEED®) certification, which is awarded to buildings that prioritize sustainability and efficient resource use, has been increasingly sought in new construction. As LEED-certified buildings become more commonplace, it is worthwhile to consider whether these new building practices improve IAQ for its occupants. This study compares particulate matter (PM) concentrations in 12 LEED-certified buildings to 12 analogous non-LEED certified buildings on the University of Utah campus. Real-time air sampling was conducted in each building for PM measurements and a Wilcoxon signed rank test was conducted to compare PM levels. A statistically significant difference was found between LEED certification and PM concentrations, with LEED-certified buildings containing, on average, approximately half the PM of their non-LEED counterparts. These findings suggest that LEED certification is worth the financial investment, as it may lead to improved IAQ for residents. However, further research on other contaminants is warranted, including the characterization and comparison of formaldehyde and carbon dioxide levels.

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          Most cited references 36

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          Particulate Matter Exposure and Stress Hormone Levels

          Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with a number of adverse health outcomes, but potential mechanisms are largely unknown. Metabolomics represents a powerful approach to study global metabolic changes in response to environmental exposures. We therefore conducted this study to investigate changes in serum metabolites in response to the reduction of PM exposure among healthy college students.
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            Sick building syndrome.

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              The impact of working in a green certified building on cognitive function and health

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                College Publishing
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1943-4618
                1552-6100
                Summer 2020
                21 September 2020
                : 15
                : 3
                : 55-66
                Author notes

                1. Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Utah, 391 Chipeta Way, Suite C, SLC, UT 84108. Telephone: 801-581-4800 Fax: 801-581-7224

                (*Corresponding Author: rod.handy@ 123456hsc.utah.edu )
                Article
                10.3992/jgb.15.3.55
                © 2020 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 12
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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