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      Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine binding to melanin: Some possible consequences for pathologies

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      Toxicology Reports

      Elsevier

      Melanin, Chloroquine, Hydroxychloroquine, Sepia, Adsorption, Desorption

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          Abstract

          For many years chloroquine was used as a prophylactic agent against malaria, and more recently as a mild immunosuppressive. However, due to lengthy treatment periods, adverse effects have become apparent, which included retinopathy. The structurally related hydroxychloroquine is less toxic, thought to be owing to a lower tissue accumulation in melanin rich areas. This study primarily focused on quantifying melanin binding between chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine at physiological pH to investigate the potential link between binding and reported toxicity. In addition, for the first time this study quantified the actual extent of adsorption of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine to melanin and examined the desorption profile of both drugs from melanin to demonstrate the affinity between the pigment and the solutes. The results suggest that there is a difference between the adsorption affinities of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, potentially explaining the differences in bioaccumulation in retinal tissue. In addition, both solutes displayed a strong physical attraction to the absorbent.

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          Most cited references 31

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          Neuropathology of Parkinson's disease.

           L Forno (1996)
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            Melanosome evolution indicates a key physiological shift within feathered dinosaurs.

            Inference of colour patterning in extinct dinosaurs has been based on the relationship between the morphology of melanin-containing organelles (melanosomes) and colour in extant bird feathers. When this relationship evolved relative to the origin of feathers and other novel integumentary structures, such as hair and filamentous body covering in extinct archosaurs, has not been evaluated. Here we sample melanosomes from the integument of 181 extant amniote taxa and 13 lizard, turtle, dinosaur and pterosaur fossils from the Upper-Jurassic and Lower-Cretaceous of China. We find that in the lineage leading to birds, the observed increase in the diversity of melanosome morphologies appears abruptly, near the origin of pinnate feathers in maniraptoran dinosaurs. Similarly, mammals show an increased diversity of melanosome form compared to all ectothermic amniotes. In these two clades, mammals and maniraptoran dinosaurs including birds, melanosome form and colour are linked and colour reconstruction may be possible. By contrast, melanosomes in lizard, turtle and crocodilian skin, as well as the archosaurian filamentous body coverings (dinosaur 'protofeathers' and pterosaur 'pycnofibres'), show a limited diversity of form that is uncorrelated with colour in extant taxa. These patterns may be explained by convergent changes in the key melanocortin system of mammals and birds, which is known to affect pleiotropically both melanin-based colouration and energetic processes such as metabolic rate in vertebrates, and may therefore support a significant physiological shift in maniraptoran dinosaurs.
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              History and importance of antimalarial drug resistance.

              The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to widely used antimalarial drugs such as chloroquine (CQ) has made malaria control and treatment much more difficult. This is particularly dramatic for Africa, as few affordable alternatives are available. Drug pressure has been identified as one of the key factors for the emergence and spread of resistance. The contribution of the extensive use and misuse of antimalarial drugs to the selection of resistant parasites became particularly evident during the Global Malaria Eradication campaign, launched by World Health Organization (WHO) in 1955. The first reports confirming P. falciparum resistance to CQ came almost simultaneously in the early 1960s from South America and South-East Asia, where direct or indirect (through use of medicated cooking salt) mass drug administration (MDA) had been implemented. Similar approaches were very limited in Africa, where P. falciparum resistance to CQ was first reported from the eastern region in the late 1970s and spread progressively west. Most African countries still rely heavily on CQ as first-line treatment despite various levels of resistance, although some states have changed to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as the first-line drug. Unfortunately, the predicted SP useful therapeutic life might be very short, probably because of its prolonged half-life, causing a higher probability of selecting resistant strains and a consequent fast development of resistance. CQ resistance is not evenly distributed and important differences can be found within and between countries. It seems to have spread more rapidly in East than in West Africa. Considering the high level of CQ use in West Africa, other factors such as intensity of transmission, population immunity or population movements should be considered when explaining the different levels of resistance. Understanding such factors may help us in devising strategies to contain the spread of drug resistance.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Toxicol Rep
                Toxicol Rep
                Toxicology Reports
                Elsevier
                2214-7500
                04 November 2014
                2014
                04 November 2014
                : 1
                : 963-968
                Affiliations
                School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, The University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. Tel.: +61 8 8302 2568; fax: +61 8 8302 1087 Cobus.Gerber@ 123456unisa.edu.au
                Article
                S2214-7500(14)00116-4
                10.1016/j.toxrep.2014.10.019
                5598414
                © 2014 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

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