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      Is Open Access

      Correction: The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), It's Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course)

      The PLOS ONE Staff

      PLoS ONE

      Public Library of Science

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          Abstract

          Notice of Republication This article was republished on September 6, 2016, to correct an error in the article title that was introduced during the typesetting process. The publisher apologizes for the error. Please download this article again to view the correct version. The originally published, uncorrected article and the republished, corrected article are provided here for reference. Supporting Information S1 File Originally published, uncorrected article. (PDF) Click here for additional data file. S2 File Republished, corrected article. (PDF) Click here for additional data file.

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          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The Post-Embargo Open Access Citation Advantage: It Exists (Probably), It’s Modest (Usually), and the Rich Get Richer (of Course)

           Jim Ottaviani (2016)
          Many studies show that open access (OA) articles—articles from scholarly journals made freely available to readers without requiring subscription fees—are downloaded, and presumably read, more often than closed access/subscription-only articles. Assertions that OA articles are also cited more often generate more controversy. Confounding factors (authors may self-select only the best articles to make OA; absence of an appropriate control group of non-OA articles with which to compare citation figures; conflation of pre-publication vs. published/publisher versions of articles, etc.) make demonstrating a real citation difference difficult. This study addresses those factors and shows that an open access citation advantage as high as 19% exists, even when articles are embargoed during some or all of their prime citation years. Not surprisingly, better (defined as above median) articles gain more when made OA.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            PLoS One
            PLoS ONE
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
            1932-6203
            21 October 2016
            2016
            : 11
            : 10
            Article
            PONE-D-16-40392
            10.1371/journal.pone.0165166
            5074514
            27768781
            © 2016 The PLOS ONE Staff

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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