16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Giant Viruses of the Kutch Desert

      Preprint
      ,

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Kutch desert (Great Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India) is a unique ecosystem: in the larger part of the year it is a hot, salty desert that is flooded regularly in the Indian monsoon season. In the dry season, the crystallized salt deposits form the "white desert" in large regions. The first metagenomic analysis of the soil samples of Kutch was published in 2013, and the data was deposited in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive. The sequences were analyzed at the same time phylogenetically for prokaryotes, especially for bacterial taxa. In the present work, we are searching for the DNA sequences of the recently discovered giant viruses in the soil samples of the Kutch desert. Since most giant viruses were discovered in biofilms in industrial cooling towers, ocean water and freshwater ponds, we were surprised to find their DNA sequences in the soil samples of a seasonally very hot and arid, salty environment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references1

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Viruses with More Than 1,000 Genes: Mamavirus, a New Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Strain, and Reannotation of Mimivirus Genes

          The genome sequence of the Mamavirus, a new Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus strain, is reported. With 1,191,693 nt in length and 1,023 predicted protein-coding genes, the Mamavirus has the largest genome among the known viruses. The genomes of the Mamavirus and the previously described Mimivirus are highly similar in both the protein-coding genes and the intergenic regions. However, the Mamavirus contains an extra 5′-terminal segment that encompasses primarily disrupted duplicates of genes present elsewhere in the genome. The Mamavirus also has several unique genes including a small regulatory polyA polymerase subunit that is shared with poxviruses. Detailed analysis of the protein sequences of the two Mimiviruses led to a substantial amendment of the functional annotation of the viral genomes.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            2014-10-06
            2014-10-07
            Article
            1410.1278
            588f7d4c-e506-484c-833d-efc90d79073b

            http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

            History
            Custom metadata
            q-bio.GN q-bio.PE

            Genetics
            Genetics

            Comments

            Comment on this article