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      Longitudinal Associations Between Humor Styles and Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence

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          Abstract

          This study assessed the concurrent and prospective associations between psychosocial adjustment and four humor styles, two of which are adaptive (affiliative, self-enhancing) and two maladaptive (aggressive, self-defeating). Participants were 1,234 adolescents (52% female) aged 11-13 years, drawn from six secondary schools in England. Self-reports of psychosocial adjustment (loneliness, depressive symptomatology, and self-esteem) and humor styles were collected at two time points (fall and summer). In cross-lagged panel analyses, self-defeating humor was associated with an increase in both depressive symptoms and loneliness, and with a decrease in self-esteem. In addition, depressive symptoms predicted an increase in the use of self-defeating humor over time, indicating that these may represent a problematic spiral of thoughts and behaviors. Self-esteem was associated with an increase in the use of affiliative humor over the school year but not vice-versa. These results inform our understanding of the ways in which humor is associated with psychosocial adjustment in adolescence.

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          Most cited references27

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          Cutoff criteria for fit indexes in covariance structure analysis: Conventional criteria versus new alternatives

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            What Reviewers Should Expect from Authors Regarding Common Method Bias in Organizational Research

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              The role of rumination in depressive disorders and mixed anxiety/depressive symptoms.

              Several studies have shown that people who engage in ruminative responses to depressive symptoms have higher levels of depressive symptoms over time, after accounting for baseline levels of depressive symptoms. The analyses reported here showed that rumination also predicted depressive disorders, including new onsets of depressive episodes. Rumination predicted chronicity of depressive disorders before accounting for the effects of baseline depressive symptoms but not after accounting for the effects of baseline depressive symptoms. Rumination also predicted anxiety symptoms and may be particularly characteristic of people with mixed anxiety/depressive symptoms.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EJOP
                Eur J Psychol
                Europe's Journal of Psychology
                Eur. J. Psychol.
                PsychOpen
                1841-0413
                19 August 2016
                : 12
                : 3
                : 377-389
                Affiliations
                [a ]School of Psychology, Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom
                [b ]School of Psychological Sciences and Health, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom
                [c ]University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
                [d ]Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, United Kingdom
                [5]Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
                Author notes
                [* ]School of Psychology, Keele University, Staffs. ST5 5BG, United Kingdom. c.fox@ 123456keele.ac.uk
                Article
                ejop.v12i3.1065
                10.5964/ejop.v12i3.1065
                4991046
                27547255
                58ad63aa-967b-487f-9568-b516b22a58f8
                Copyright @ 2016

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 26 October 2015
                : 19 December 2015
                Categories
                Research Reports

                Psychology
                adolescence,humor,self-esteem,psychosocial adjustment,loneliness,depression
                Psychology
                adolescence, humor, self-esteem, psychosocial adjustment, loneliness, depression

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