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      Resilience, Reorientation, and Reinvention: School Leadership During the Early Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Frontiers in Education

      Frontiers Media SA

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          Abstract

          As the COVID-19 pandemic spread rapidly across the globe, many schools struggled to react both quickly and adequately. Schools were one of the most important societal institutions to be affected by the pandemic. However, most school leaders have little to no training in crisis leadership, nor have they dealt with a crisis of this scale and this scope for this long. This article presents our findings from interviews of 43 school organizations around the globe about their responses during the early months of the pandemic. Primary themes from the interviews included an emphasis on vision and values; communication and family community engagement; staff care, instructional leadership, and organizational capacity-building; equity-oriented leadership practices; and recognition of potential future opportunities. These findings resonate with the larger research literature on crisis leadership and have important implications for school leaders’ future mindsets, behaviors, and support structures during crisis incidents.

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          Most cited references 37

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Frontiers in Education
                Front. Educ.
                Frontiers Media SA
                2504-284X
                March 12 2021
                March 12 2021
                : 6
                Article
                10.3389/feduc.2021.637075
                © 2021

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