11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Replication of honey bee-associated RNA viruses across multiple bee species in apple orchards of Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The essential ecosystem service of pollination is provided largely by insects, which are considered threatened by diverse biotic and abiotic global change pressures. RNA viruses are one such pressure, and have risen in prominence as a major threat for honey bees (Apis mellifera) and global apiculture, as well as a risk factor for other bee species through pathogen spill-over between managed honey bees and sympatric wild pollinator communities. Yet despite their potential role in global bee decline, the prevalence of honey bee-associated RNA viruses in wild bees is poorly known from both geographic and taxonomic perspectives. We screened members of pollinator communities (honey bees, bumble bees and other wild bees belonging to four families) collected from apple orchards in Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan for six common honey bee-associated RNA virus complexes encompassing nine virus targets. The Deformed wing virus complex (DWV genotypes A and B) had the highest prevalence across all localities and host species and was the only virus complex found in wild bee species belonging to all four studied families. Based on amplification of negative-strand viral RNA, we found evidence for viral replication in wild bee species of DWV-A/DWV-B (hosts: Andrena haemorrhoa and several Bombus spp.) and Black queen cell virus (hosts: Anthophora plumipes, several Bombus spp., Osmia bicornis and Xylocopa spp.). Viral amplicon sequences revealed that DWV-A and DWV-B are regionally distinct but identical in two or more bee species at any one site, suggesting virus is shared amongst sympatric bee taxa. This study demonstrates that honey bee associated RNA viruses are geographically and taxonomically widespread, likely infective in wild bee species, and shared across bee taxa.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Invertebr. Pathol.
          Journal of invertebrate pathology
          Elsevier BV
          1096-0805
          0022-2011
          Jun 2017
          : 146
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Molecular Evolution and Animal Systematics, Institute of Biology, University of Leipzig, Talstraβe 33, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; General Zoology, Institute for Biology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 8, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany; Life Sciences Center, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 7, 10223 Vilnius, Lithuania. Electronic address: rita.radzeviciute@yahoo.de.
          [2 ] General Zoology, Institute for Biology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 8, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
          [3 ] General Zoology, Institute for Biology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Hoher Weg 8, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany; Department of Entomology, Centrum für Naturkunde (CeNak), University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 3, 20146 Hamburg, Germany.
          [4 ] Institute of Entomology, Agricultural University of Georgia, 240 Agmashenebeli Alley, Tbilisi 0159, Georgia; Invertebrate Research Center, 26 Agladze str., Tbilisi 0119, Georgia.
          [5 ] Institute of Entomology, Agricultural University of Georgia, 240 Agmashenebeli Alley, Tbilisi 0159, Georgia.
          [6 ] Academy of Public Administration Under the President of the Kyrgyz Republic, 237 Panfilova str., Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.
          Article
          S0022-2011(16)30262-2
          10.1016/j.jip.2017.04.002
          28392285
          590195bb-b153-4de8-b280-f627e7904591

          ABPV,Apis mellifera,Bombus,CBPV,DWV-A,DWV-B,Pathogen,SBPV,SBV,Wild bee
          ABPV, Apis mellifera, Bombus, CBPV, DWV-A, DWV-B, Pathogen, SBPV, SBV, Wild bee

          Comments

          Comment on this article