11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Patient medication knowledge and adherence to asthma pharmacotherapy: a pilot study in rural Australia

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Asthma is a chronic disease with both inflammatory and bronchoconstrictive elements and often requires multiple medications. Most asthma regimens include medications with different therapeutic modes of action and a number of different medication delivery devices. To effectively participate in their asthma management, patients need to recognize each of their medication types, understand their purpose, adhere to their treatment regimen, and be proficient in using the required delivery devices. This study evaluated patient knowledge of asthma pharmacotherapy and adherence. An interview study was undertaken in two rural locations, in Australia, to elicit participants' knowledge, use, and inhalation device technique. Of participants, 75.9% used preventer medication and the remaining 24.1% used reliever medication only. Of those using preventer medication, 82.5% could distinguish their preventer from a range of asthma medicines. Metered dose inhalers (MDIs) were used by 80% of participants; 23% used a Turbuhaler®; 24% used an Accuhaler®; and 5% used an MDI with a spacer device. The study established poor medication knowledge, suboptimal device technique, and disturbing levels of adherence with management recommendations. Asthma education strategies need to be modified to engage patients with low asthma knowledge to achieve improved patient outcomes. Further, strategies need to motivate patients to use preventer medication during times when they feel well.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Methods of Social Research

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The Australian Burden of Disease Study: measuring the loss of health from diseases, injuries and risk factors.

            This is an overview of the first burden of disease and injury studies carried out in Australia. Methods developed for the World Bank and World Health Organization Global Burden of Disease Study were adapted and applied to Australian population health data. Depression was found to be the top-ranking cause of non-fatal disease burden in Australia, causing 8% of the total years lost due to disability in 1996. Mental disorders overall were responsible for nearly 30% of the non-fatal disease burden. The leading causes of total disease burden (disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) were ischaemic heart disease and stroke, together causing nearly 18% of the total disease burden. Depression was the fourth leading cause of disease burden, accounting for 3.7% of the total burden. Of the 10 major risk factors to which the disease burden can be attributed, tobacco smoking causes an estimated 10% of the total disease burden in Australia, followed by physical inactivity (7%).
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Comparison of asthma prevalence in the ISAAC and the ECRHS. ISAAC Steering Committee and the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood.

              International and regional prevalence comparisons are required to test and generate hypotheses regarding the causes of increasing asthma prevalence in various age groups worldwide. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) is the first such study in children and the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) is the first such study in adults. Therefore, a comparison of the findings of these two surveys was conducted, for the 17 countries in which both surveys were undertaken. There was a strong correlation between the ISAAC and ECRHS prevalence data, with 64% of the variation at the country level, and 74% of the variation at the centre level, in the prevalence of "wheeze in the last 12 months" in the ECRHS phase I data being explained by the variation in the ISAAC phase I data. There was also generally good agreement in the international patterns observed in the two surveys for self-reported asthma (74% of country level and 36% of centre level variation explained), self-reported asthma before age 14 yrs (64 and 26%), hay fever (61 and 73%) and eczema (41 and 50%). Thus although there were differences in the absolute levels of prevalence observed in the two surveys, there is good overall agreement between the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood and European Community Respiratory Health Survey study findings with regard to international prevalence patterns. These findings, therefore, add support to the validity of the two studies, which provide a new picture of global patterns of asthma prevalence from child- to adulthood, and identify some of the key phenomena which future research must address.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                March 2005
                March 2005
                : 1
                : 1
                : 33-38
                Affiliations
                School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Deborah L Burton, School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Locked Bag 588, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia Tel +61 02 6933 2059 Fax +61 02 6933 2587 Email dburton@ 123456csu.edu.au
                Article
                1661608
                18360541
                © 2005 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved
                Categories
                Original Research

                Medicine

                medication adherence, asthma, medication knowledge

                Comments

                Comment on this article