0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Housing in Place: Housing, Neighbourhood and Resettlement for People from Refugee and Asylum Seeker Backgrounds in Australia

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Housing is an important part of building a new life for people from refugee and asylum seeker backgrounds. However, relatively little is known about how housing and neighbourhood experiences affect resettlement and integration. This paper explored experiences of housing and neighbourhood for refugees and asylum seekers in South Australia, Australia. A survey was completed by 423 participants, recruited through service providers, community networks and snowball sampling. Data was analysed using frequencies, chi-square analyses and multivariate logistic regression. The study identified aspects of housing and neighbourhood that were important to participants, as well as highlighting key problems. Housing satisfaction and neighbourhood satisfaction were positively associated, but housing satisfaction was lower than neighbourhood satisfaction. Both were significantly associated with overall satisfaction with life in Australia, although only neighbourhood satisfaction remained significant in the final multivariate model (alongside region of origin, visa and financial situation). Overall, the findings suggest that where housing is situated may be more important for resettlement satisfaction and integration than the housing itself. Policy and practice implications of the findings are discussed, alongside considerations for conceptualising integration.

          Related collections

          Most cited references47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Immigration, Acculturation, and Adaptation

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prevalence of serious mental disorder in 7000 refugees resettled in western countries: a systematic review.

            About 13 million people are classified as refugees worldwide, and many more former refugees have been granted citizenship in their new countries. However, the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, or psychotic illnesses in these individuals is not known. We did a systematic review of surveys about these disorders in general refugee populations in western countries. We searched for psychiatric surveys that were based on interviews of unselected refugee populations and that included current diagnoses of post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, psychotic illnesses, or generalised anxiety disorder. We did computer-assisted searches, scanned reference lists, searched journals, and corresponded with authors to determine prevalence rates of these mental disorders and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity, such as diagnostic criteria, sampling methods, and other characteristics. 20 eligible surveys provided results for 6743 adult refugees from seven countries, with substantial variation in assessment and sampling methods. In the larger studies, 9% (99% CI 8-10%) were diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and 5% (4-6%) with major depression, with evidence of much psychiatric comorbidity. Five surveys of 260 refugee children from three countries yielded a prevalence of 11% (7-17%) for post-traumatic stress disorder. Larger and more rigorous surveys reported lower prevalence rates than did studies with less optimum designs, but heterogeneity persisted even in findings from the larger studies. Refugees resettled in western countries could be about ten times more likely to have post-traumatic stress disorder than age-matched general populations in those countries. Worldwide, tens of thousands of refugees and former refugees resettled in western countries probably have post-traumatic stress disorder.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Understanding Home: A Critical Review of the Literature

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                anna.ziersch@flinders.edu.au
                Journal
                J Int Migr Integr
                J Int Migr Integr
                Journal of International Migration and Integration
                Springer Netherlands (Dordrecht )
                1488-3473
                1874-6365
                24 February 2023
                24 February 2023
                : 1-24
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.1014.4, ISNI 0000 0004 0367 2697, College of Medicine and Public Health, , Flinders University, ; Adelaide, Australia
                [2 ]GRID grid.1010.0, ISNI 0000 0004 1936 7304, School of Psychology, , University of Adelaide, ; Adelaide, Australia
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6600-2568
                Article
                1008
                10.1007/s12134-023-01008-w
                9950696
                5971086d-73e5-42ae-b6eb-7bd8ddf08c50
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 7 January 2023
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000923, Australian Research Council;
                Award ID: LP130100782
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article

                refugee,asylum seeker,housing,neighbourhood,integration,resettlement

                Comments

                Comment on this article