Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Frontal fibrosing alopecia treatment options

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a multicenter review of 355 patients.

          To our knowledge, there are no large multicenter studies concerning frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) that could give clues about its pathogenesis and best treatment.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a review of 60 cases.

            Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a variant of lichen planopilaris primarily affecting postmenopausal women, with a predilection for the frontotemporal hairline. We sought to examine possible causal associations and review the clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment of patients with FFA attending a specialist hair clinic. This was a case note review of 60 patients with FFA. The number of patients with FFA seen has increased over the last decade. All were Caucasian women, with significantly above-average affluence scores and were less likely to be smokers. The mean age at presentation was 64 years and average disease duration was 3.4 years (range: 6 months-30 years). Three patients were premenopausal. All patients had frontotemporal involvement, with follicular hyperkeratosis, scarring, and variable perifollicular erythema. Several patients had more unusual patterns: 8 had extensive parietal involvement, 4 had occipital involvement, 1 had asymmetric frontal involvement, and 5 had typical FFA associated with diffuse scalp lichen planopilaris. Eyebrow loss was documented in 73%, eyelash loss in 3%, and body hair loss in 25%. Almost all patients had been treated with superpotent topical steroids. Other treatments included topical calcineurin inhibitors; intralesional triamcinolone acetate; phototherapy; hydroxychloroquine; lymecycline; and prednisolone. Although some treatments may reduce inflammation, their efficacy in controlling the progress of the alopecia was uncertain. This is a retrospective review. FFA is a clinically distinctive condition, the prevalence of which appears to be increasing. It has a generally poor response to treatment. The origin remains uncertain. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Frontal fibrosing alopecia: a clinical review of 36 patients.

              Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a primary lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia with a distinctive clinical pattern of progressive frontotemporal hairline recession. Currently, there are no evidence-based studies to guide treatment for patients with FFA; thus, treatment options vary among clinicians.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
                IRDR
                International Research and Cooperation Association for Bio & Socio-Sciences Advancement (IRCA-BSSA)
                2186-361X
                2186-3644
                2016
                2016
                : 5
                : 4
                : 314-315
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery
                Article
                10.5582/irdr.2016.01065
                © 2016

                Comments

                Comment on this article