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      Phenology of epigeous macrofungi found in red gum woodlands

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      Fungal Biology

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The timing of fruiting body production by epigeous macrofungi is thought to be mostly determined by substrate moisture and temperature. Understanding the environmental cues that influence fruiting can help when designing surveys, interpreting results, and predicting effects of an altered climate. Species fruiting in 22 river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) woodland sites in southeastern Australia was recorded at regular intervals over 2 y. Models were constructed to explain the phenology of 25 of the most common species, as well as the total number of species found fruiting on each survey occasion. We found that rainfall minus evaporation and the time of year each influenced fruiting of the common fungi, but to varying degrees depending on species. Using these same variables, the model predictions for the total number of species expected to be found on each survey occasion fit the observations reasonably well (R(2)=0.49). The models could be used to estimate the probability of presence for species of conservation interest, to optimise survey timing, or to predict effects of climate change on fruiting. Copyright © 2009 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Fungal Biology
          Fungal Biology
          Elsevier BV
          18786146
          February 2010
          February 2010
          : 114
          : 2-3
          : 171-178
          Article
          10.1016/j.funbio.2009.12.001
          20943127
          © 2010

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