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      Childhood Dual Burden of Under- and Overnutrition in Low- and Middle-inCome Countries: A Critical Review

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      Food and Nutrition Bulletin

      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          In low- and middle-income countries, the distribution of childhood nutritional diseases is shifting from a predominance of undernutrition to a dual burden of under- and overnutrition. This novel and complex problem challenges governments and health organizations to tackle opposite ends of the malnutrition spectrum. The dual burden may manifest within a community, household, or individual, but these different levels have not been addressed collectively.

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          Most cited references 77

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          Maternal and child undernutrition and overweight in low-income and middle-income countries

          The Lancet, 382(9890), 427-451
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            Evidence-based interventions for improvement of maternal and child nutrition: what can be done and at what cost?

            The Lancet, 382(9890), 452-477
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              Asians are different from Caucasians and from each other in their body mass index/body fat per cent relationship.

              The objective was to study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and body fat per cent (BF%) in different population groups of Asians. The study design was a literature overview with special attention to recent Asian data. Specific information is provided on Indonesians (Malays and Chinese ancestry), Singaporean Chinese, Malays and Indians, and Hong Kong Chinese. The BMI was calculated from weight and height and the BF% was determined by deuterium oxide dilution, a chemical-for-compartment model, or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All Asian populations studied had a higher BF% at a lower BMI compared to Caucasians. Generally, for the same BMI their BF% was 3-5% points higher compared to Caucasians. For the same BF% their BMI was 3-4 units lower compared to Caucasians. The high BF% at low BMI can be partly explained by differences in body build, i.e. differences in trunk-to-leg-length ratio and differences in slenderness. Differences in muscularity may also contribute to the different BF%/BMI relationship. Hence, the relationship between BF% and BMI is ethnic-specific. For comparisons of obesity prevalence between ethnic groups, universal BMI cut-off points are not appropriate.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Food and Nutrition Bulletin
                Food Nutr Bull
                SAGE Publications
                0379-5721
                1564-8265
                June 26 2014
                June 2014
                June 26 2014
                June 2014
                : 35
                : 2
                : 230-243
                Article
                10.1177/156482651403500210
                4313560
                25076771
                © 2014

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