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      Diabetes insipidus and cognitive function.

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          Abstract

          It has been well known that several neuropeptides may affect human behavior, and that some endocrinopathies are associated with impaired higher function of the brain. There have been increasing evidences that vasopressin has both peripheral and central effects, the latter of which is involved in memory. In experimental animals, male mice with a null mutation in the V1a receptor (V1aR) exhibit a profound impairment in social recognition and changes in anxiety-like behavior. An AVP fragment analog has been reported to facilitate memory retention and recall in mice through protein kinase C-independent pathways. In human, a few recent reports have suggested that a familial central diabetes insipidus, caused by a heterozygous mutation in the gene for vasopressin prohormone, have minor disturbances in central nervous system. Taken together, it is hypothesized that the subject with central diabetes insipidus may frequently present with an impaired cognitive ability. It is justified to examine the cognitive function, when we make a diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and to perform a clinical study to investigate whether central diabetes insipidus may be associated with impairment of higher brain functions.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Med. Hypotheses
          Medical hypotheses
          Elsevier BV
          0306-9877
          0306-9877
          2007
          : 69
          : 4
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, The Tazuke Kofukai Foundation Medical Research Institute, Kitano Hospital, Osaka 530-8480, Japan. k-nabe@kitano-hp.or.jp
          Article
          S0306-9877(07)00171-5
          10.1016/j.mehy.2007.01.081
          17467188

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