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      An updated human snoRNAome

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          Abstract

          Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that guide the post-transcriptional processing of other non-coding RNAs (mostly ribosomal RNAs), but have also been implicated in processes ranging from microRNA-dependent gene silencing to alternative splicing. In order to construct an up-to-date catalog of human snoRNAs we have combined data from various databases, de novo prediction and extensive literature review. In total, we list more than 750 curated genomic loci that give rise to snoRNA and snoRNA-like genes. Utilizing small RNA-seq data from the ENCODE project, our study characterizes the plasticity of snoRNA expression identifying both constitutively as well as cell type specific expressed snoRNAs. Especially, the comparison of malignant to non-malignant tissues and cell types shows a dramatic perturbation of the snoRNA expression profile. Finally, we developed a high-throughput variant of the reverse-transcriptase-based method for identifying 2′-O-methyl modifications in RNAs termed RimSeq. Using the data from this and other high-throughput protocols together with previously reported modification sites and state-of-the-art target prediction methods we re-estimate the snoRNA target RNA interaction network. Our current results assign a reliable modification site to 83% of the canonical snoRNAs, leaving only 76 snoRNA sequences as orphan.

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          Most cited references 103

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          The GENCODE v7 catalog of human long noncoding RNAs: analysis of their gene structure, evolution, and expression.

          The human genome contains many thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). While several studies have demonstrated compelling biological and disease roles for individual examples, analytical and experimental approaches to investigate these genes have been hampered by the lack of comprehensive lncRNA annotation. Here, we present and analyze the most complete human lncRNA annotation to date, produced by the GENCODE consortium within the framework of the ENCODE project and comprising 9277 manually annotated genes producing 14,880 transcripts. Our analyses indicate that lncRNAs are generated through pathways similar to that of protein-coding genes, with similar histone-modification profiles, splicing signals, and exon/intron lengths. In contrast to protein-coding genes, however, lncRNAs display a striking bias toward two-exon transcripts, they are predominantly localized in the chromatin and nucleus, and a fraction appear to be preferentially processed into small RNAs. They are under stronger selective pressure than neutrally evolving sequences-particularly in their promoter regions, which display levels of selection comparable to protein-coding genes. Importantly, about one-third seem to have arisen within the primate lineage. Comprehensive analysis of their expression in multiple human organs and brain regions shows that lncRNAs are generally lower expressed than protein-coding genes, and display more tissue-specific expression patterns, with a large fraction of tissue-specific lncRNAs expressed in the brain. Expression correlation analysis indicates that lncRNAs show particularly striking positive correlation with the expression of antisense coding genes. This GENCODE annotation represents a valuable resource for future studies of lncRNAs.
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            Landscape of transcription in human cells

            Summary Eukaryotic cells make many types of primary and processed RNAs that are found either in specific sub-cellular compartments or throughout the cells. A complete catalogue of these RNAs is not yet available and their characteristic sub-cellular localizations are also poorly understood. Since RNA represents the direct output of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell’s regulatory capabilities are focused on its synthesis, processing, transport, modifications and translation, the generation of such a catalogue is crucial for understanding genome function. Here we report evidence that three quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels of expression, localization, processing fates, regulatory regions and modifications of almost all currently annotated and thousands of previously unannotated RNAs. These observations taken together prompt to a redefinition of the concept of a gene.
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              Infernal 1.1: 100-fold faster RNA homology searches

              Summary: Infernal builds probabilistic profiles of the sequence and secondary structure of an RNA family called covariance models (CMs) from structurally annotated multiple sequence alignments given as input. Infernal uses CMs to search for new family members in sequence databases and to create potentially large multiple sequence alignments. Version 1.1 of Infernal introduces a new filter pipeline for RNA homology search based on accelerated profile hidden Markov model (HMM) methods and HMM-banded CM alignment methods. This enables ∼100-fold acceleration over the previous version and ∼10 000-fold acceleration over exhaustive non-filtered CM searches. Availability: Source code, documentation and the benchmark are downloadable from http://infernal.janelia.org. Infernal is freely licensed under the GNU GPLv3 and should be portable to any POSIX-compliant operating system, including Linux and Mac OS/X. Documentation includes a user’s guide with a tutorial, a discussion of file formats and user options and additional details on methods implemented in the software. Contact: nawrockie@janelia.hhmi.org
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                20 June 2016
                12 May 2016
                12 May 2016
                : 44
                : 11
                : 5068-5082
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Computational and Systems Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Basel CH-4056, Switzerland
                [2 ]Bioinformatics Group, Department of Computer Science, and Interdisciplinary Center for Bioinformatics, University of Leipzig, D-04107 Leipzig, Germany
                [3 ]Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany
                [4 ]RNomics Group, Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany
                [5 ]Department of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
                [6 ]Santa Fe Institute, NM-87501Santa Fe, USA
                Author notes
                [* ]To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +41 61 267 18 86; Email: agruber@ 123456tbi.univie.ac.at
                Correspondence may also be addressed to Mihaela Zavolan. Tel: +41 61 267 15 77; Email: mihaela.zavolan@ 123456unibas.ch
                []These authors contributed equally to the paper as first authors.
                10.1093/nar/gkw386
                4914119
                27174936
                © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@ 123456oup.com

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                20 June 2016

                Genetics

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