Blog
About

6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Analog to Digital: Transitions in Theory and Practice in Archaeological Photography at Çatalhöyük

       

      Internet Archaeology

      Council for British Archaeology

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Archaeology and photography has a long, co-constructed history that has increasingly come under scrutiny as archaeologists negotiate the visual turn. Yet these investigations do not make use of existing qualitative and quantitative strategies developed by visual studies to understand representation in archaeological photographs. This article queries the large photographic archive created by ongoing work at the archaeological site of Çatalhöyük in Turkey to consider the visual impact of changing photographic technologies and of a shifting theoretical focus in archaeology. While using content analysis and semiotic analysis to gain a better understanding of the visual record, these analyses also unexpectedly reveal power dynamics and other social factors present during archaeological investigation. Consequently, becoming conversant in visual analyses can contribute to developing more reflexive modes of representation in archaeology.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Professional Vision

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            ‘Always momentary, fluid and flexible’: towards a reflexive excavation methodology

             Ian Hodder (1997)
            Çatalhöyük, on the Konya Plain in south central Anatolia, in the 1960s became the most celebrated Neolithic site of western Asia: huge (21 hectares), with early dates, tightpacked rooms with roof access, exuberant mural paintings, cattle heads fixed to walls, dead buried beneath floors in collective graves.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Symmetrical archaeology: excerpts of a manifesto

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Internet Archaeology
                IA
                Council for British Archaeology
                13635387
                2016
                2016
                :
                : 42
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of York
                Article
                10.11141/ia.42.7
                © 2016

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

                Product
                Self URI (journal page): http://intarch.ac.uk/

                Pre-history, Early modern history, Archaeology, Anthropology, Ancient history, History

                Comments

                Comment on this article