8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A review of the applications of the hydrofiber dressing with silver (Aquacel Ag ®) in wound care

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Aquacel Ag ® (ConvaTec, Princeton, NJ, USA) is a new hydrofiber wound dressing consisting of soft non-woven sodium carboxymethylcellulose fibers integrated with ionic silver. It is a moisture-retention dressing, which forms a gel on contact with wound fluid and has antimicrobial properties of ionic silver. We present a current literature review on Aquacel Ag ®, of both in vitro and in vivo efficacy and clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the wide antimicrobial properties of Aquacel Ag ®, and additionally demonstrated the cytotoxicity of ionic silver to keratinocytes and fibroblasts that cause delay in wound re-epithelialization. Clinical studies confirmed that Aquacel Ag ® is an effective and safe dressing for a variety of wound types, both acute and chronic. Incorporation of ionic silver into the hydrofibers does not cause undue alteration in the performance properties of the base dressing, which continues to provide favorable wound moisture and exudate management. The addition of ionic silver reduces local pain and dressing changes, and provides significant broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, with no delay in wound healing.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 35

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Silver. I: Its antibacterial properties and mechanism of action.

          Silver products have two key advantages: they are broad-spectrum antibiotics and are not yet associated with drug resistance. This article, the first in a two-part series, describes the main mechanism of action of this metallic element.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            In vitro cytotoxity of silver: implication for clinical wound care.

            In this study, we look at the cytotoxic effects of silver on keratinocytes and fibroblasts. We have assessed the viability of monolayer cultures using the MTT and BrdU assays. The composition of the culture medium and also the culture technique were modified to assess the effects of culture 'environment' on the susceptibility of the cells to the toxic action of silver. Further in vitro, experiments were performed using tissue culture models to allow cellular behavior in three dimensional planes which more closely simulated in vivo behavior. The silver source was both silver released from silver nitrate solution but also nanocrystalline silver released from a commercially available dressing. The results show that silver is highly toxic to both keratinocytes and fibroblasts in monolayer culture. When using optimized and individualized culture the fibroblasts appear to be more sensitive to silver than keratinocytes. However, when both cell types were grown in the same medium their viability was the same. Using tissue culture models again indicated an 'environmental effect' with decreased sensitivity of the cells to the cytotoxic effects of the silver. Nevertheless in these studies the toxic dose of skin cells ranging from 7 x 10(-4) to 55 x 10(-4)% was similar to that of bacteria. These results suggest that consideration of the cytotoxic effects of silver and silver-based products should be taken when deciding on dressings for specific wound care strategies. This is important when using keratinocyte culture, in situ, which is playing an increasing role in contemporary wound and burn care.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A comparative study of the cytotoxicity of silver-based dressings in monolayer cell, tissue explant, and animal models.

              Over the past decade, a variety of advanced silver-based dressings have been developed. There are considerable variations in the structure, composition, and silver content of these new preparations. In the present study, we examined five commercially available silver-based dressings (Acticoat, Aquacel Ag, Contreet Foam, PolyMem Silver, Urgotul SSD). We assessed their cytotoxicity in a monolayer cell culture, a tissue explant culture model, and a mouse excisional wound model. The results showed that Acticoat, Aquacel Ag, and Contreet Foam, when pretreated with specific solutes, were likely to produce the most significant cytotoxic effects on both cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts, while PolyMem Silver and Urgotul SSD demonstrated the least cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity correlated with the silver released from the dressings as measured by silver concentration in the culture medium. In the tissue explant culture model, in which the epidermal cell proliferation was evaluated, all silver dressings resulted in a significant delay of reepithelialization. In the mouse excisional wound model, Acticoat and Contreet Foam indicated a strong inhibition of wound reepithelialization on the postwounding-day 7. These findings may, in part, explain the clinical observations of delayed wound healing or inhibition of wound epithelialization after the use of certain topical silver dressings. Caution should be exercised in using silver-based dressings in clean superficial wounds such as donor sites and superficial burns and also when cultured cells are being applied to wounds.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2010
                2010
                2 February 2010
                : 6
                : 21-27
                Affiliations
                Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Affiliated with the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Yoav Barnea, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6 Weizmann Street, Tel Aviv, Israel 64239, Tel +972 3 6973320, Fax +972 3 6973890, Email barneay@ 123456netvision.net.il
                Article
                tcrm-6-021
                2817785
                20169033
                © 2010 Barnea et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Review

                Medicine

                silver, hydrofiber, wound dressing, aquacel ag®, carboxymethylcellulose

                Comments

                Comment on this article