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A novel anti-proliferative pentapeptide (ILYMP) isolated from Cyclina sinensis protein hydrolysate induces apoptosis of DU-145 prostate cancer cells

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      Abstract

      Prostate cancer is the main causes of cancer associated mortality in men worldwide, cancer patients often suffer serious side effects when treated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy, therefore novel drugs are in high demand to treat prostate cancer. In the present study, a pentapeptide (Ile-Leu-Tyr-Met-Pro; ILYMP) with a molecular weight of 635.71 Da was isolated from the protein hydrolysate of Cyclina sinensis via ultrafiltration and chromatographic methods, and subsequently named Cyclina sinensis pentapeptide (CSP). The activity of CSP was first investigated in prostate cancer (PCa) DU-145 cells. CSP was demonstrated to significantly inhibit DU-145 cell proliferation at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 11.25 mM at a 72 h time interval. In addition, the results of acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining, scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry analyses suggested that CSP inhibited DU-145 cell proliferation via the induction of apoptosis. Following treatment with CSP, Bcl-2-associated X (Bax), cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9 protein expression levels were enhanced in DU-145 cells; whereas B-cell lymphoma 2 expression was suppressed in DU-145 cells. In conclusion, to the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects of an anti-proliferative peptide derived from Cyclina sinensis on DU-145 cells, and the results suggested that CSP may represent a therapeutic nutraceutical agent for the treatment of patients with PCa.

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      Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly applying effective prevention measures, such as tobacco control, vaccination, and the use of early detection tests. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
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        Caspases are a family of endoproteases that provide critical links in cell regulatory networks controlling inflammation and cell death. The activation of these enzymes is tightly controlled by their production as inactive zymogens that gain catalytic activity following signaling events promoting their aggregation into dimers or macromolecular complexes. Activation of apoptotic caspases results in inactivation or activation of substrates, and the generation of a cascade of signaling events permitting the controlled demolition of cellular components. Activation of inflammatory caspases results in the production of active proinflammatory cytokines and the promotion of innate immune responses to various internal and external insults. Dysregulation of caspases underlies human diseases including cancer and inflammatory disorders, and major efforts to design better therapies for these diseases seek to understand how these enzymes work and how they can be controlled.
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          Abiraterone acetate for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: final overall survival analysis of the COU-AA-301 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study.

          Abiraterone acetate improved overall survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer at a preplanned interim analysis of the COU-AA-301 double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study. Here, we present the final analysis of the study before crossover from placebo to abiraterone acetate (after 775 of the prespecified 797 death events). Between May 8, 2008, and July 28, 2009, this study enrolled 1195 patients at 147 sites in 13 countries. Patients were eligible if they had metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel. Patients were stratified according to baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, worst pain over the past 24 h on the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, number of previous chemotherapy regimens, and type of progression. Patients were randomly assigned (ratio 2:1) to receive either abiraterone acetate (1000 mg, once daily and orally) plus prednisone (5 mg, orally twice daily) or placebo plus prednisone with a permuted block method via an interactive web response system. The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00091442. Of the 1195 eligible patients, 797 were randomly assigned to receive abiraterone acetate plus prednisone (abiraterone group) and 398 to receive placebo plus prednisone (placebo group). At median follow-up of 20·2 months (IQR 18·4-22·1), median overall survival for the abiraterone group was longer than in the placebo group (15·8 months [95% CI 14·8-17·0] vs 11·2 months [10·4-13·1]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·74, 95% CI 0·64-0·86; p<0·0001). Median time to PSA progression (8·5 months, 95% CI 8·3-11·1, in the abiraterone group vs 6·6 months, 5·6-8·3, in the placebo group; HR 0·63, 0·52-0·78; p<0·0001), median radiologic progression-free survival (5·6 months, 5·6-6·5, vs 3·6 months, 2·9-5·5; HR 0·66, 0·58-0·76; p<0·0001), and proportion of patients who had a PSA response (235 [29·5%] of 797 patients vs 22 [5·5%] of 398; p<0·0001) were all improved in the abiraterone group compared with the placebo group. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were fatigue (72 [9%] of 791 patients in the abiraterone group vs 41 [10%] of 394 in the placebo group), anaemia (62 [8%] vs 32 [8%]), back pain (56 [7%] vs 40 [10%]), and bone pain (51 [6%] vs 31 [8%]). This final analysis confirms that abiraterone acetate significantly prolongs overall survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who have progressed after docetaxel treatment. No new safety signals were identified with increased follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]School of Food and Pharmacy, Zhejiang Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center of Marine Biomedical Products, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, Zhejiang 316022, P.R. China
            [2 ]Aquatic Processing Department, Zhejiang Marine Fisheries Research Institution, Zhoushan, Zhejiang 316021, P.R. China
            Author notes
            Correspondence to: Professor Zuisu Yang, School of Food and Pharmacy, Zhejiang Provincial Engineering Technology Research Center of Marine Biomedical Products, Zhejiang Ocean University, 1 Haida South Road, Lincheng, Changzhi Island, Zhoushan, Zhejiang 316022, P.R. China, E-mail: abc1967@ 123456126.com
            Journal
            Mol Med Rep
            Mol Med Rep
            Molecular Medicine Reports
            D.A. Spandidos
            1791-2997
            1791-3004
            July 2018
            14 May 2018
            14 May 2018
            : 18
            : 1
            : 771-778
            6059706 10.3892/mmr.2018.9019 mmr-18-01-0771
            Copyright: © Yu et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

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