3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Quercetin inhibits transforming growth factor β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in human retinal pigment epithelial cells via the Smad pathway

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect and mechanism of quercetin on TGF-β1-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix secretion.

          Materials and methods

          Cell counting kit-8, transwell, wound-healing assays, and ELISA were used to assess viability, migration, and collagen I secretion, respectively. Western blot analysis and qPCR were employed to detect mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively.

          Results

          Quercetin suppressed TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation, migration, and collagen I secretion. The results also showed that mRNA and protein expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related markers such as alpha-smooth muscle actin and N-cadherin was downregulated by quercetin in TGF-β1-treated RPE cells; conversely, quercetin upregulated the expression of E-cadherin and tight junction protein 1 (ZO-1). In addition, quercetin could inhibit mRNA and protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Quercetin may reverse the progression of EMT via the Smad2/3 pathway.

          Conclusion

          Our results demonstrate the protective effects of quercetin on RPE cell EMT, revealing a potential therapeutic agent for proliferative vitreoretinopathy treatment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Proliferative vitreoretinopathy: A new concept of disease pathogenesis and practical consequences.

          During the last four decades, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) has defied the efforts of many researchers to prevent its occurrence or development. Thus, PVR is still the major complication following retinal detachment (RD) surgery and a bottle-neck for advances in cell therapy that require intraocular surgery. In this review we tried to combine basic and clinical knowledge, as an example of translational research, providing new and practical information for clinicians. PVR was defined as the proliferation of cells after RD. This idea was used for classifying PVR and also for designing experimental models used for testing many drugs, none of which were successful in humans. We summarize current information regarding the pathogenic events that follow any RD because this information may be the key for understanding and treating the earliest stages of PVR. A major focus is made on the intraretinal changes derived mainly from retinal glial cell reactivity. These responses can lead to intraretinal PVR, an entity that has not been clearly recognized. Inflammation is one of the major components of PVR, and we describe new genetic biomarkers that have the potential to predict its development. New treatment approaches are analyzed, especially those directed towards neuroprotection, which can also be useful for preventing visual loss after any RD. We also summarize the results of different surgical techniques and clinical information that is oriented toward the identification of high risk patients. Finally, we provide some recommendations for future classification of PVR and for designing comparable protocols for testing new drugs or techniques.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Myofibroblast transdifferentiation: The dark force in ocular wound healing and fibrosis.

            Wound healing is one of the most complex biological processes to occur in life. Repair of tissue following injury involves dynamic interactions between multiple cell types, growth factors, inflammatory mediators and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aberrant and uncontrolled wound healing leads to a non-functional mass of fibrotic tissue. In the eye, fibrotic disease disrupts the normally transparent ocular tissues resulting in irreversible loss of vision. A common feature in fibrotic eye disease is the transdifferentiation of cells into myofibroblasts that can occur through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts rapidly produce excessive amounts of ECM and exert tractional forces across the ECM, resulting in the distortion of tissue architecture. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) plays a major role in myofibroblast transdifferentiation and has been implicated in numerous fibrotic eye diseases including corneal opacification, pterygium, anterior subcapsular cataract, posterior capsular opacification, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, fibrovascular membrane formation associated with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, submacular fibrosis, glaucoma and orbital fibrosis. This review serves to introduce the pathological functions of the myofibroblast in fibrotic eye disease. We also highlight recent developments in elucidating the multiple signaling pathways involved in fibrogenesis that may be exploited in the development of novel anti-fibrotic therapies to reduce ocular morbidity due to scarring.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Quercetin prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation and reducing autophagy via the TGF-β1/Smads and PI3K/Akt pathways

              The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on hepatic fibrosis, a characteristic response to acute or chronic liver injury. Mice were randomized to bile duct ligation (BDL) or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) cirrhosis models. Quercetin (100 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg daily) was administered by gavage for 2 or 4 weeks. Liver tissue and blood samples were collected for histological and molecular analysis. The results of our experiments showed that quercetin reduced BDL or CCl4 liver fibrosis, inhibited extracellular matrix formation, and regulated matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. Quercetin attenuated liver damage by suppressing the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway and activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to inhibit autophagy in BDL- or CCl4- induced liver fibrosis. Quercetin prevented hepatic fibrosis by attenuating hepatic stellate cell activation and reducing autophagy through regulating crosstalk between the TGF-β1/Smads and PI3K/Akt pathways.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2018
                06 December 2018
                : 12
                : 4149-4161
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital Affiliated with Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China, dryujing@ 123456aliyun.com
                [2 ]Department of Ophthalmology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China
                [3 ]Department of Ophthalmology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China
                [4 ]Department of Ophthalmology, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan, People’s Republic of China
                [5 ]Department of Ophthalmology, Ninghai First Hospital, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China, dryujing@ 123456aliyun.com
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jing Yu, Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital Affiliated with Tongji University, 301 Middle Yanchang Road, Shanghai 200072, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 21 1891 768 3348, Email dryujing@ 123456aliyun.com
                [*]

                These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                dddt-12-4149
                10.2147/DDDT.S185618
                6287523
                © 2018 Cai et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article