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      A second generation human haplotype map of over 3.1 million SNPs

      The International HapMap Consortium

      Nature

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          We describe the Phase II HapMap, which characterizes over 3.1 million human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 270 individuals from four geographically diverse populations and includes 25-35% of common SNP variation in the populations surveyed. The map is estimated to capture untyped common variation with an average maximum r2 of between 0.9 and 0.96 depending on population. We demonstrate that the current generation of commercial genome-wide genotyping products captures common Phase II SNPs with an average maximum r2 of up to 0.8 in African and up to 0.95 in non-African populations, and that potential gains in power in association studies can be obtained through imputation. These data also reveal novel aspects of the structure of linkage disequilibrium. We show that 10-30% of pairs of individuals within a population share at least one region of extended genetic identity arising from recent ancestry and that up to 1% of all common variants are untaggable, primarily because they lie within recombination hotspots. We show that recombination rates vary systematically around genes and between genes of different function. Finally, we demonstrate increased differentiation at non-synonymous, compared to synonymous, SNPs, resulting from systematic differences in the strength or efficacy of natural selection between populations.

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          Most cited references 41

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          Global variation in copy number in the human genome.

          Copy number variation (CNV) of DNA sequences is functionally significant but has yet to be fully ascertained. We have constructed a first-generation CNV map of the human genome through the study of 270 individuals from four populations with ancestry in Europe, Africa or Asia (the HapMap collection). DNA from these individuals was screened for CNV using two complementary technologies: single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays, and clone-based comparative genomic hybridization. A total of 1,447 copy number variable regions (CNVRs), which can encompass overlapping or adjacent gains or losses, covering 360 megabases (12% of the genome) were identified in these populations. These CNVRs contained hundreds of genes, disease loci, functional elements and segmental duplications. Notably, the CNVRs encompassed more nucleotide content per genome than SNPs, underscoring the importance of CNV in genetic diversity and evolution. The data obtained delineate linkage disequilibrium patterns for many CNVs, and reveal marked variation in copy number among populations. We also demonstrate the utility of this resource for genetic disease studies.
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            Efficiency and power in genetic association studies.

            We investigated selection and analysis of tag SNPs for genome-wide association studies by specifically examining the relationship between investment in genotyping and statistical power. Do pairwise or multimarker methods maximize efficiency and power? To what extent is power compromised when tags are selected from an incomplete resource such as HapMap? We addressed these questions using genotype data from the HapMap ENCODE project, association studies simulated under a realistic disease model, and empirical correction for multiple hypothesis testing. We demonstrate a haplotype-based tagging method that uniformly outperforms single-marker tests and methods for prioritization that markedly increase tagging efficiency. Examining all observed haplotypes for association, rather than just those that are proxies for known SNPs, increases power to detect rare causal alleles, at the cost of reduced power to detect common causal alleles. Power is robust to the completeness of the reference panel from which tags are selected. These findings have implications for prioritizing tag SNPs and interpreting association studies.
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              The fine-scale structure of recombination rate variation in the human genome.

              The nature and scale of recombination rate variation are largely unknown for most species. In humans, pedigree analysis has documented variation at the chromosomal level, and sperm studies have identified specific hotspots in which crossing-over events cluster. To address whether this picture is representative of the genome as a whole, we have developed and validated a method for estimating recombination rates from patterns of genetic variation. From extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism surveys in European and African populations, we find evidence for extreme local rate variation spanning four orders in magnitude, in which 50% of all recombination events take place in less than 10% of the sequence. We demonstrate that recombination hotspots are a ubiquitous feature of the human genome, occurring on average every 200 kilobases or less, but recombination occurs preferentially outside genes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                October 2007
                October 2007
                : 449
                : 7164
                : 851-861
                Article
                10.1038/nature06258
                2689609
                17943122
                © 2007

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