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      Are populations of coral reef fish open or closed?

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      Trends in Ecology & Evolution

      Elsevier BV

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          RECRUITMENT AND THE LOCAL DYNAMICS OF OPEN MARINE POPULATIONS

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            Connectivity of marine populations: open or closed?

            Most marine populations are thought to be well connected via long-distance dispersal of larval stages. Eulerian and Lagrangian flow models, coupled with linear mortality estimates, were used to examine this assumption. The findings show that when simple advection models are used, larval exchange rates may be overestimated; such simplistic models fail to account for a decrease of up to nine orders of magnitude in larval concentrations resulting from diffusion and mortality. The alternative process of larval retention near local populations is shown to exist and may be of great importance in the maintenance of marine population structure and management of coastal marine resources.
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              Connectivity and management of caribbean coral reefs

              Roberts (1997)
              Surface current patterns were used to map dispersal routes of pelagic larvae from 18 coral reef sites in the Caribbean. The sites varied, both as sources and recipients of larvae, by an order of magnitude. It is likely that sites supplied copiously from "upstream" reef areas will be more resilient to recruitment overfishing, less susceptible to species loss, and less reliant on local management than places with little upstream reef. The mapping of connectivity patterns will enable the identification of beneficial management partnerships among nations and the design of networks of interdependent reserves.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Trends in Ecology & Evolution
                Trends in Ecology & Evolution
                Elsevier BV
                01695347
                September 2002
                September 2002
                : 17
                : 9
                : 422-428
                Article
                10.1016/S0169-5347(02)02584-3
                5bbc8d53-e347-41d0-876e-a7824586661c
                © 2002

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