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      Our health and theirs: forced migration, othering, and public health.

      1 ,
      Social science & medicine (1982)
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          This paper uses 'othering' theory to explore how forced migrants are received in developed countries and considers the implications of this for public health. It identifies a variety of mechanisms by which refugees, asylum seekers and irregular migrants are positioned as 'the other' and are defined and treated as separate, distant and disconnected from the host communities in receiving countries. The paper examines how this process has the potential to affect health outcomes both for individuals and communities and concludes that public health must engage with and challenge this othering discourse. It argues that public health practitioners have a critical role to play in reframing thinking about health services and health policies for forced migrants, by promoting inclusion and by helping shape a narrative which integrates and values the experiences of this population.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Soc Sci Med
          Social science & medicine (1982)
          Elsevier BV
          0277-9536
          0277-9536
          Apr 2006
          : 62
          : 8
          Affiliations
          [1 ] School of Public Health and Community Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. n.grove@unsw.edu.au
          Article
          S0277-9536(05)00480-6
          10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.08.061
          16242227
          5beaab02-9062-4f8d-bc1f-0551a9a1daa2
          History

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