Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Mapping Community Determinants of Heat Vulnerability

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      BackgroundThe evidence that heat waves can result in both increased deaths and illness is substantial, and concern over this issue is rising because of climate change. Adverse health impacts from heat waves can be avoided, and epidemiologic studies have identified specific population and community characteristics that mark vulnerability to heat waves.ObjectivesWe situated vulnerability to heat in geographic space and identified potential areas for intervention and further research.MethodsWe mapped and analyzed 10 vulnerability factors for heat-related morbidity/mortality in the United States: six demographic characteristics and two household air conditioning variables from the U.S. Census Bureau, vegetation cover from satellite images, and diabetes prevalence from a national survey. We performed a factor analysis of these 10 variables and assigned values of increasing vulnerability for the four resulting factors to each of 39,794 census tracts. We added the four factor scores to obtain a cumulative heat vulnerability index value.ResultsFour factors explained > 75% of the total variance in the original 10 vulnerability variables: a) social/environmental vulnerability (combined education/poverty/race/green space), b) social isolation, c) air conditioning prevalence, and d) proportion elderly/diabetes. We found substantial spatial variability of heat vulnerability nationally, with generally higher vulnerability in the Northeast and Pacific Coast and the lowest in the Southeast. In urban areas, inner cities showed the highest vulnerability to heat.ConclusionsThese methods provide a template for making local and regional heat vulnerability maps. After validation using health outcome data, interventions can be targeted at the most vulnerable populations.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 38

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      More intense, more frequent, and longer lasting heat waves in the 21st century.

      A global coupled climate model shows that there is a distinct geographic pattern to future changes in heat waves. Model results for areas of Europe and North America, associated with the severe heat waves in Chicago in 1995 and Paris in 2003, show that future heat waves in these areas will become more intense, more frequent, and longer lasting in the second half of the 21st century. Observations and the model show that present-day heat waves over Europe and North America coincide with a specific atmospheric circulation pattern that is intensified by ongoing increases in greenhouse gases, indicating that it will produce more severe heat waves in those regions in the future.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Temperature and mortality in 11 cities of the eastern United States.

        Episodes of extremely hot or cold temperatures are associated with increased mortality. Time-series analyses show an association between temperature and mortality across a range of less extreme temperatures. In this paper, the authors describe the temperature-mortality association for 11 large eastern US cities in 1973-1994 by estimating the relative risks of mortality using log-linear regression analysis for time-series data and by exploring city characteristics associated with variations in this temperature-mortality relation. Current and recent days' temperatures were the weather components most strongly predictive of mortality, and mortality risk generally decreased as temperature increased from the coldest days to a certain threshold temperature, which varied by latitude, above which mortality risk increased as temperature increased. The authors also found a strong association of the temperature-mortality relation with latitude, with a greater effect of colder temperatures on mortality risk in more-southern cities and of warmer temperatures in more-northern cities. The percentage of households with air conditioners in the south and heaters in the north, which serve as indicators of socioeconomic status of the city population, also predicted weather-related mortality. The model developed in this analysis is potentially useful for projecting the consequences of climate-change scenarios and offering insights into susceptibility to the adverse effects of weather.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Heat-related deaths during the July 1995 heat wave in Chicago.

          During a record-setting heat wave in Chicago in July 1995, there were at least 700 excess deaths, most of which were classified as heat-related. We sought to determine who was at greatest risk for heat-related death. We conducted a case-control study in Chicago to identify risk factors associated with heat-related death and death from cardiovascular causes from July 14 through July 17, 1995. Beginning on July 21, we interviewed 339 relatives, neighbors, or friends of those who died and 339 controls matched to the case subjects according to neighborhood and age. The risk of heat-related death was increased for people with known medical problems who were confined to bed (odds ratio as compared with those who were not confined to bed, 5.5) or who were unable to care for themselves (odds ratio, 4.1). Also at increased risk were those who did not leave home each day (odds ratio, 6.7), who lived alone (odds ratio, 2.3), or who lived on the top floor of a building (odds ratio, 4.7). Having social contacts such as group activities or friends in the area was protective. In a multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for heat-related death were being confined to bed (odds ratio, 8.2) and living alone (odds ratio, 2.3); the risk of death was reduced for people with working air conditioners (odds ratio, 0.3) and those with access to transportation (odds ratio, 0.3). Deaths classified as due to cardiovascular causes had risk factors similar to those for heat-related death. In this study of the 1995 Chicago heat wave, those at greatest risk of dying from the heat were people with medical illnesses who were socially isolated and did not have access to air conditioning. In future heat emergencies, interventions directed to such persons should reduce deaths related to the heat.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] Environmental Health Sciences Division, School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, California, USA
            [2 ] School of Public Health and
            [3 ] School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
            [4 ] Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
            Author notes
            Address correspondence to C. Reid, Environmental Health Sciences Division, School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley, 50 University Hall #7360, Berkely, CA 94720-7360, USA. Telephone: 510-643-9257. Fax: 510-642-5815. E-mail: creid@ 123456berkeley.edu
            [*]

            C.E.R was an Association of Schools of Public Health Environmental Health Fellow at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency when this work was done.

            The authors declare they have no competing financial interests.

            Journal
            Environ Health Perspect
            Environmental Health Perspectives
            National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
            0091-6765
            1552-9924
            November 2009
            10 June 2009
            : 117
            : 11
            : 1730-1736
            2801183
            20049125
            10.1289/ehp.0900683
            ehp-117-1730
            This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original DOI.
            Categories
            Research

            Comments

            Comment on this article