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      Is Open Access

      Abstracts from the Rocky Mountain ACP/AMA Internal Medicine Conference – Banff November 16-18, 2017.

      Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
      Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.

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          Abstract

          Abstracts from the Rocky Mountain ACP/AMA Internal Medicine Conference – Banff November 16-18, 2017.

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          Special report: suicidal ideation among American surgeons.

          Suicide is a disproportionate cause of death for US physicians. The prevalence of suicidal ideation (SI) among surgeons and their use of mental health resources are unknown. Members of the American College of Surgeons were sent an anonymous cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey included questions regarding SI and use of mental health resources, a validated depression screening tool, and standardized assessments of burnout and quality of life. Of 7905 participating surgeons (response rate, 31.7%), 501 (6.3%) reported SI during the previous 12 months. Among individuals 45 years and older, SI was 1.5 to 3.0 times more common among surgeons than the general population (P < .02). Only 130 surgeons (26.0%) with recent SI had sought psychiatric or psychologic help, while 301 (60.1%) were reluctant to seek help due to concern that it could affect their medical license. Recent SI had a large, statistically significant adverse relationship with all 3 domains of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment) and symptoms of depression. Burnout (odds ratio, 1.910; P < .001) and depression (odds ratio, 7.012; P < .001) were independently associated with SI after controlling for personal and professional characteristics. Other personal and professional characteristics also related to the prevalence of SI. Although 1 of 16 surgeons reported SI in the previous year, few sought psychiatric or psychologic help. Recent SI among surgeons was strongly related to symptoms of depression and a surgeon's degree of burnout. Studies are needed to determine how to reduce SI among surgeons and how to eliminate barriers to their use of mental health resources.
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            Association of resident fatigue and distress with occupational blood and body fluid exposures and motor vehicle incidents.

            To evaluate the effect of resident physicians' distress on their personal safety.
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              Author and article information

              Journal
              Canadian Journal of General Internal Medicine
              Can Journ Gen Int Med
              Dougmar Publishing Group, Inc.
              2369-1778
              1911-1606
              March 05 2018
              March 05 2018
              : 13
              : 1
              Article
              10.22374/cjgim.v13i1.274
              5c585502-48cd-4f4f-a746-ecf5e8ca998e
              © 2018

              Copyright of articles published in all DPG titles is retained by the author. The author grants DPG the rights to publish the article and identify itself as the original publisher. The author grants DPG exclusive commercial rights to the article. The author grants any non-commercial third party the rights to use the article freely provided original author(s) and citation details are cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/


              General medicine,Geriatric medicine,Neurology,Internal medicine
              General medicine, Geriatric medicine, Neurology, Internal medicine

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