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Hooked on fat: the role of lipid synthesis in cancer metabolism and tumour development

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      Abstract

      An increased rate of lipid synthesis in cancerous tissues has long been recognised as an important aspect of the rewired metabolism of transformed cells. However, the contribution of lipids to cellular transformation, tumour development and tumour progression, as well as their potential role in facilitating the spread of cancerous cells to secondary sites, are not yet fully understood. In this article, we review the recent findings that support the importance of lipid synthesis and metabolism in tumorigenesis. Specifically, we explore the role of aberrant lipid biosynthesis in cancer cell migration and invasion, and in the induction of tumour angiogenesis. These processes are crucial for the dissemination of tumour cells and formation of metastases, which constitute the main cause of cancer mortality.

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      Microenvironmental regulation of metastasis.

      Metastasis is a multistage process that requires cancer cells to escape from the primary tumour, survive in the circulation, seed at distant sites and grow. Each of these processes involves rate-limiting steps that are influenced by non-malignant cells of the tumour microenvironment. Many of these cells are derived from the bone marrow, particularly the myeloid lineage, and are recruited by cancer cells to enhance their survival, growth, invasion and dissemination. This Review describes experimental data demonstrating the role of the microenvironment in metastasis, identifies areas for future research and suggests possible new therapeutic avenues.
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        Accessories to the crime: functions of cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment.

        Mutationally corrupted cancer (stem) cells are the driving force of tumor development and progression. Yet, these transformed cells cannot do it alone. Assemblages of ostensibly normal tissue and bone marrow-derived (stromal) cells are recruited to constitute tumorigenic microenvironments. Most of the hallmarks of cancer are enabled and sustained to varying degrees through contributions from repertoires of stromal cell types and distinctive subcell types. Their contributory functions to hallmark capabilities are increasingly well understood, as are the reciprocal communications with neoplastic cancer cells that mediate their recruitment, activation, programming, and persistence. This enhanced understanding presents interesting new targets for anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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          Tumour-cell invasion and migration: diversity and escape mechanisms.

          Cancer cells possess a broad spectrum of migration and invasion mechanisms. These include both individual and collective cell-migration strategies. Cancer therapeutics that are designed to target adhesion receptors or proteases have not proven to be effective in slowing tumour progression in clinical trials--this might be due to the fact that cancer cells can modify their migration mechanisms in response to different conditions. Learning more about the cellular and molecular basis of these different migration/invasion programmes will help us to understand how cancer cells disseminate and lead to new treatment strategies.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Gene Expression Analysis Laboratory, Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, WC2A 3LY, UK
            Author notes
            [*]

            Present address: Molecular Oncology Laboratory, The Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK

            []Author for correspondence ( almut.schulze@ 123456cancer.org.uk )
            Journal
            Dis Model Mech
            Dis Model Mech
            dmm
            DMM
            Disease Models & Mechanisms
            The Company of Biologists Limited
            1754-8403
            1754-8411
            November 2013
            : 6
            : 6
            : 1353-1363
            3820259
            10.1242/dmm.011338
            0061353
            © 2013. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.

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            Molecular medicine

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