4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      IL-1 signaling mediates intrauterine inflammation and chorio-decidua neutrophil recruitment and activation

      , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
      JCI Insight
      American Society for Clinical Investigation

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="d13809826e267">Neutrophil infiltration of the chorioamnion-decidua tissue at the maternal-fetal interface (chorioamnionitis) is a leading cause of prematurity, fetal inflammation, and perinatal mortality. We induced chorioamnionitis in preterm rhesus macaques by intraamniotic injection of LPS. Here, we show that, during chorioamnionitis, the amnion upregulated phospho-IRAK1–expressed neutrophil chemoattractants <i>CXCL8</i> and <i>CSF3</i> in an IL-1–dependent manner. IL-1R blockade decreased chorio-decidua neutrophil accumulation, neutrophil activation, and IL-6 and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in the amniotic fluid. Neutrophils accumulating in the chorio-decidua had increased survival mediated by <i>BCL2A1</i>, and IL-1R blockade also decreased BCL2A1 <sup>+</sup> chorio-decidua neutrophils. Readouts for inflammation in a cohort of women with preterm delivery and chorioamnionitis were similar to findings in the rhesus macaques. IL-1 is a potential therapeutic target for chorioamnionitis and associated morbidities. </p><p class="first" id="d13809826e282">IL-1 signaling critically regulates accumulation and activation of neutrophils at the maternal-fetal interface in a Rhesus macaque model system. </p>

          Related collections

          Most cited references85

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Exploring the full spectrum of macrophage activation.

          Macrophages display remarkable plasticity and can change their physiology in response to environmental cues. These changes can give rise to different populations of cells with distinct functions. In this Review we suggest a new grouping of macrophage populations based on three different homeostatic activities - host defence, wound healing and immune regulation. We propose that similarly to primary colours, these three basic macrophage populations can blend into various other 'shades' of activation. We characterize each population and provide examples of macrophages from specific disease states that have the characteristics of one or more of these populations.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Epidemiology and causes of preterm birth

            Summary This paper is the first in a three-part series on preterm birth, which is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Infants are born preterm at less than 37 weeks' gestational age after: (1) spontaneous labour with intact membranes, (2) preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM), and (3) labour induction or caesarean delivery for maternal or fetal indications. The frequency of preterm births is about 12–13% in the USA and 5–9% in many other developed countries; however, the rate of preterm birth has increased in many locations, predominantly because of increasing indicated preterm births and preterm delivery of artificially conceived multiple pregnancies. Common reasons for indicated preterm births include pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Births that follow spontaneous preterm labour and PPROM—together called spontaneous preterm births—are regarded as a syndrome resulting from multiple causes, including infection or inflammation, vascular disease, and uterine overdistension. Risk factors for spontaneous preterm births include a previous preterm birth, black race, periodontal disease, and low maternal body-mass index. A short cervical length and a raised cervical-vaginal fetal fibronectin concentration are the strongest predictors of spontaneous preterm birth.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Neutrophils in the activation and regulation of innate and adaptive immunity.

              Neutrophils have long been viewed as the final effector cells of an acute inflammatory response, with a primary role in the clearance of extracellular pathogens. However, more recent evidence has extended the functions of these cells. The newly discovered repertoire of effector molecules in the neutrophil armamentarium includes a broad array of cytokines, extracellular traps and effector molecules of the humoral arm of the innate immune system. In addition, neutrophils are involved in the activation, regulation and effector functions of innate and adaptive immune cells. Accordingly, neutrophils have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a broad range of diseases, including infections caused by intracellular pathogens, autoimmunity, chronic inflammation and cancer.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                JCI Insight
                American Society for Clinical Investigation
                2379-3708
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                March 22 2018
                : 3
                : 6
                Article
                10.1172/jci.insight.98306
                5926925
                29563340
                5cabfc04-37ae-4de8-829e-e556e9800f21
                © 2018
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article