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      Nutrient Dynamics of a Swarm-founding Social Wasp Species, Polybia occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)

      , , ,
      Ethology
      Wiley

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          A modified spectrophotometric determination of chymotrypsin, trypsin, and thrombin.

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            Dominance Order in Polistes Wasps

            L PARDI (1948)
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              SEASONAL VARIATION IN BODY SIZE AND REPRODUCTIVE CONDITION OF A PAPER WASP, POLISTES METRICUS (HYMENOPTERA: VESPIDAE)

              Seasonal morphometric analysis of 788 adultPolistes metricusSay showed that: (1) Queens sampled throughout the colony cycle were of similar body size but significantly smaller than fall gynes. (2) Queens’ ovaries are large in the spring, decline early in the colony cycle, peak near the mid-postemergence period and decline late in the colony cycle. (3) There are no significant correlations between head width, ovary width, and size of nest in workers or queens. (4) Early and late workers are small but workers emerging during the mid-postemergence period are large. (5) All workers and gynes emerge with small, similar sized ovaries but older workers may develop larger ovaries. (6) Queens are larger than early and late workers but the same size as workers emerging during the mid-postemergence period. (7) The class with the largest adults were intermediates collected when colonies began production of males. These adults, intermediate in fat content between workers and gynes, comprised a large proportion of females emerging late in the colony cycle. (8) The body size of gynes is independent of colony size. (9) Males were significantly more variable in body size than gynes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ethology
                Wiley
                01791613
                14390310
                January 12 1987
                April 26 2010
                : 75
                : 4
                : 291-305
                Article
                10.1111/j.1439-0310.1987.tb00661.x
                5ccda62c-b834-4e5b-9cd4-cd0b47273bd0
                © 2010

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1


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