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      Deep Carbon and the Life Cycle of Large Igneous Provinces

      1 , 2
      Elements
      Mineralogical Society of America

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          Abstract

          Carbon is central to the formation and environmental impact of large igneous provinces (LIPs). These vast magmatic events occur over geologically short timescales and include voluminous flood basalts, along with silicic and low-volume alkaline magmas. Surface outgassing of CO2 from flood basalts may average up to 3,000 Mt per year during LIP emplacement and is subsidized by fractionating magmas deep in the crust. The large quantities of carbon mobilized in LIPs may be sourced from the convecting mantle, lithospheric mantle and crust. The relative significance of each potential carbon source is poorly known and probably varies between LIPs. Because LIPs draw on mantle reservoirs typically untapped during plate boundary magmatism, they are integral to Earth's long-term carbon cycle.

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          Most cited references30

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          Large igneous provinces: Crustal structure, dimensions, and external consequences

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            The deep carbon cycle and melting in Earth's interior

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              On the ages of flood basalt events

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Elements
                Mineralogical Society of America
                1811-5217
                1811-5209
                October 1 2019
                October 1 2019
                : 15
                : 5
                : 319-324
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, CUNY City College of New York, USA
                [2 ]Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK
                Article
                10.2138/gselements.15.5.319
                5d414387-be45-454c-b5ae-cfe298e9dba7
                © 2019

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

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