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      Volumetric properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide in liquid water.

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          Abstract

          The volumetric properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in water were studied in a wide temperature range by computer simulations. The intrinsic density rho(p) and the intrinsic thermal expansion coefficient alpha(p) of hIAPP were evaluated by taking into account the difference between the volumetric properties of hydration and bulk water. The density of hydration water rho(h) was found to decrease almost linearly with temperature upon heating and its thermal expansion coefficient was found to be notably higher than that of bulk water. The peptide surface exposed to water is more hydrophobic and its rho(h) is smaller in conformation with a larger number of intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The two hIAPP peptides studied (with and without disulfide bridge) show negative alpha(p), which is close to zero at 250 K and decreases to approximately -1.5 x 10(-3) K(-1) upon heating to 450 K. The analysis of various structural properties of peptides shows a correlation between the intrinsic peptide volumes and the number of intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. The obtained negative values of alpha(p) can be attributed to the shrinkage of the inner voids of the peptides upon heating.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Phys Chem Chem Phys
          Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP
          Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
          1463-9084
          1463-9076
          Apr 28 2010
          : 12
          : 16
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Physical Chemistry, Dortmund University of Technology, Otto-Hahn-Str. 6, Dortmund, D-44227, Germany. ivan.brovchenko@uni-dortmund.de
          10.1039/b918706e
          20379517

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