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      Chemotherapy activates cancer-associated fibroblasts to maintain colorectal cancer-initiating cells by IL-17A

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          Abstract

          Chemotherapy stimulates cancer-associated fibroblasts to secrete interleukin-17A to provide maintenance cues to support the growth of colorectal cancer-initiating cells.

          Abstract

          Many solid cancers display cellular hierarchies with self-renewing, tumorigenic stemlike cells, or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) at the apex. Whereas CICs often exhibit relative resistance to conventional cancer therapies, they also receive critical maintenance cues from supportive stromal elements that also respond to cytotoxic therapies. To interrogate the interplay between chemotherapy and CICs, we investigated cellular heterogeneity in human colorectal cancers. Colorectal CICs were resistant to conventional chemotherapy in cell-autonomous assays, but CIC chemoresistance was also increased by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Comparative analysis of matched colorectal cancer specimens from patients before and after cytotoxic treatment revealed a significant increase in CAFs. Chemotherapy-treated human CAFs promoted CIC self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth associated with increased secretion of specific cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Exogenous IL-17A increased CIC self-renewal and invasion, and targeting IL-17A signaling impaired CIC growth. Notably, IL-17A was overexpressed by colorectal CAFs in response to chemotherapy with expression validated directly in patient-derived specimens without culture. These data suggest that chemotherapy induces remodeling of the tumor microenvironment to support the tumor cellular hierarchy through secreted factors. Incorporating simultaneous disruption of CIC mechanisms and interplay with the tumor microenvironment could optimize therapeutic targeting of cancer.

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          Most cited references 65

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          Molecular characterization of the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer.

          Here we describe the comprehensive gene expression profiles of each cell type composing normal breast tissue and in situ and invasive breast carcinomas using serial analysis of gene expression. Based on these data, we determined that extensive gene expression changes occur in all cell types during cancer progression and that a significant fraction of altered genes encode secreted proteins and receptors. Despite the dramatic gene expression changes in all cell types, genetic alterations were detected only in cancer epithelial cells. The CXCL14 and CXCL12 chemokines overexpressed in tumor myoepithelial cells and myofibroblasts, respectively, bind to receptors on epithelial cells and enhance their proliferation, migration, and invasion. Thus, chemokines may play a role in breast tumorigenesis by acting as paracrine factors.
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            Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 is a marker for normal and malignant human colonic stem cells (SC) and tracks SC overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis.

            Although the concept that cancers originate from stem cells (SC) is becoming scientifically accepted, mechanisms by which SC contribute to tumor initiation and progression are largely unknown. For colorectal cancer (CRC), investigation of this problem has been hindered by a paucity of specific markers for identification and isolation of SC from normal and malignant colon. Accordingly, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) was investigated as a possible marker for identifying colonic SC and for tracking them during cancer progression. Immunostaining showed that ALDH1(+) cells are sparse and limited to the normal crypt bottom, where SCs reside. During progression from normal epithelium to mutant (APC) epithelium to adenoma, ALDH1(+) cells increased in number and became distributed farther up the crypt. CD133(+) and CD44(+) cells, which are more numerous and broadly distributed in normal crypts, showed similar changes during tumorigenesis. Flow cytometric isolation of cancer cells based on enzymatic activity of ALDH (Aldefluor assay) and implantation of these cells in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient mice (a) generated xenograft tumors (Aldefluor(-) cells did not), (b) generated them after implanting as few as 25 cells, and (c) generated them dose dependently. Further isolation of cancer cells using a second marker (CD44(+) or CD133(+) serially) only modestly increased enrichment based on tumor-initiating ability. Thus, ALDH1 seems to be a specific marker for identifying, isolating, and tracking human colonic SC during CRC development. These findings also support our original hypothesis, derived previously from mathematical modeling of crypt dynamics, that progressive colonic SC overpopulation occurs during colon tumorigenesis and drives CRC development.
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              Dependency of colorectal cancer on a TGF-β-driven program in stromal cells for metastasis initiation.

              A large proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs) display mutational inactivation of the TGF-β pathway, yet, paradoxically, they are characterized by elevated TGF-β production. Here, we unveil a prometastatic program induced by TGF-β in the microenvironment that associates with a high risk of CRC relapse upon treatment. The activity of TGF-β on stromal cells increases the efficiency of organ colonization by CRC cells, whereas mice treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of TGFBR1 are resilient to metastasis formation. Secretion of IL11 by TGF-β-stimulated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) triggers GP130/STAT3 signaling in tumor cells. This crosstalk confers a survival advantage to metastatic cells. The dependency on the TGF-β stromal program for metastasis initiation could be exploited to improve the diagnosis and treatment of CRC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Exp Med
                J. Exp. Med
                jem
                The Journal of Experimental Medicine
                The Rockefeller University Press
                0022-1007
                1540-9538
                16 December 2013
                : 210
                : 13
                : 2851-2872
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine , [2 ]Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine , and [3 ]Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute ; [4 ]Department of Colorectal Surgery, Digestive Disease Institute ; [5 ]Department of Anatomical Pathology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195
                [6 ]Department of Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44195
                [7 ]ImageIQ, Cleveland, OH 44106
                [8 ]Department of General Medical Sciences–Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106
                [9 ]National Center for Regenerative Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106
                Author notes
                CORRESPONDENCE Jeremy Rich: drjeremyrich@ 123456gmail.com OR Matthew F. Kalady: kaladym@ 123456ccf.org

                F. Lotti and A.M. Jarrar contributed equally to this paper.

                Article
                20131195
                10.1084/jem.20131195
                3865474
                24323355
                © 2013 Lotti et al.

                This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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