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      Nurse-patient communication: an exploration of patients' experiences

      Journal of Clinical Nursing

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references 23

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          Nurses' communication skills: an evaluation of the impact of solution-focused communication training.

          This paper describes the evaluation of a short training course in solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT) skills. This evaluation examined the relevance of SFBT skills to nursing and the extent to which a short training course affected nurses' communication skills. Nurses' communication skills have been criticized for many years, as has the training in communication skills that nurses receive. The absence of a coherent theoretical or practical framework for communication skills training led us to consider the utility of SFBT as a framework for a short training course for qualified nurses, the majority of them are registered nurses working with adults. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected: the former using pre- and post-training scales, the latter using a focus group conducted 6 months after the training. Data were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and content analysis. Quantitative data indicated positive changes in nurses' practice following the training on four dimensions, and changes in nurses' willingness to communicate with people who are troubled reached levels of significance. Qualitative data uncovered changes to practice, centred on the rejection of problem-orientated discourses and reduced feelings of inadequacy and emotional stress in the nurses. There are indications that SFBT techniques may be relevant to nursing and a useful, cost-effective approach to the training of communication skills. Solution focused brief therapy provides a framework and easily understood tool-kit that are harmonious with nursing values.
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            Interpersonal Relations in Nursing

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              Patient perceptions of nursing care: an emerging theory of interpersonal competence.

               D Fosbinder (1994)
              Nurse-patient interactions were examined to identify elements of interpersonal competence among nurses from the perspective of patients. Forty patients and 12 nurses participated in this qualitative study at a private acute care hospital. Two-hundred and forty-five observations were completed. Open-ended questions were utilized in 85 audio-taped semi-structured interviews. Data collection and analysis occurred simultaneously using the constant comparative method. Four major processes emerged from the data to provide the framework for the themes: 'translating', 'getting to know you', 'establishing trust', and 'going the extra mile'. In the 'translating' theme, patients expressed satisfaction with the nurse-patient interaction when nurses informed, explained and instructed on specific aspects of treatment, and taught general principles of care. The nurses' personal sharing, kidding and clicking appeared as important processes in 'getting to know you'. Patients reported confidence and trust when nurses took charge and appeared to enjoy their work. The theme of 'going the extra mile' included friendship and providing care beyond that expected. The processes provide a framework for an emerging theory of interpersonal competence.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Nursing
                J Clin Nurs
                Wiley-Blackwell
                0962-1067
                1365-2702
                January 2004
                January 2004
                : 13
                : 1
                : 41-49
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.00817.x
                © 2004

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