1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A qualitative study of factors that influence active family involvement with patient care in the ICU: Survey of critical care nurses

      , , ,

      Intensive and Critical Care Nursing

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Three approaches to qualitative content analysis.

          Content analysis is a widely used qualitative research technique. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches: conventional, directed, or summative. All three approaches are used to interpret meaning from the content of text data and, hence, adhere to the naturalistic paradigm. The major differences among the approaches are coding schemes, origins of codes, and threats to trustworthiness. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data. With a directed approach, analysis starts with a theory or relevant research findings as guidance for initial codes. A summative content analysis involves counting and comparisons, usually of keywords or content, followed by the interpretation of the underlying context. The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            One-Year Outcomes in Caregivers of Critically Ill Patients.

            Few resources are available to support caregivers of patients who have survived critical illness; consequently, the caregivers' own health may suffer. We studied caregiver and patient characteristics to determine which characteristics were associated with caregivers' health outcomes during the first year after patient discharge from an intensive care unit (ICU).
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Posttraumatic stress and complicated grief in family members of patients in the intensive care unit.

              Family members of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are at risk for mental health morbidity both during and after a patient's ICU stay. To determine prevalences of and factors associated with anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress and complicated grief in family members of ICU patients. Prospective, longitudinal cohort study. Fifty family members of patients in ICUs at a large university hospital participated. We used the Control Preferences Scale to determine participants' role preferences for surrogate decision-making. We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Impact of Event Scale, and Inventory of Complicated Grief to measure anxiety and depression (at enrollment, 1 month, 6 months), posttraumatic stress (6 months), and complicated grief (6 months). We interviewed all 50 participants at enrollment, 39 (78%) at 1 month, and 34 (68%) at 6 months. At the three time points, anxiety was present in 42% (95% CI, 29-56%), 21% (95% CI, 10-35%), and 15% (95% CI, 6-29%) of participants. Depression was present in 16% (95% CI, 8-28%), 8% (95% CI, 2-19%), and 6% (95% CI, 1-18%). At 6 months, 35% (95% CI, 21-52%) of participants had posttraumatic stress. Of the 38% who were bereaved, 46% (95% CI, 22-71%) had complicated grief. Posttraumatic stress was not more common in bereaved than nonbereaved participants, and neither posttraumatic stress nor complicated grief was associated with decision-making role preference or with anxiety or depression during the patient's ICU stay. Symptoms of anxiety and depression diminished over time, but both bereaved and nonbereaved participants had high rates of posttraumatic stress and complicated grief. Family members should be assessed for posttraumatic stress and complicated grief.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Intensive and Critical Care Nursing
                Intensive and Critical Care Nursing
                Elsevier BV
                09643397
                February 2018
                February 2018
                : 44
                : 67-75
                Article
                10.1016/j.iccn.2017.08.008
                © 2018

                Comments

                Comment on this article