Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis and Treatment in Patients With Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Update Summary

      1 , 2 , 3

      Journal of Oncology Practice

      American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

           John Heit (2015)
          Thrombosis can affect any venous circulation. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes deep-vein thrombosis of the leg or pelvis, and its complication, pulmonary embolism. VTE is a fairly common disease, particularly in older age, and is associated with reduced survival, substantial health-care costs, and a high rate of recurrence. VTE is a complex (multifactorial) disease, involving interactions between acquired or inherited predispositions to thrombosis and various risk factors. Major risk factors for incident VTE include hospitalization for surgery or acute illness, active cancer, neurological disease with leg paresis, nursing-home confinement, trauma or fracture, superficial vein thrombosis, and-in women-pregnancy and puerperium, oral contraception, and hormone therapy. Although independent risk factors for incident VTE and predictors of VTE recurrence have been identified, and effective primary and secondary prophylaxis is available, the occurrence of VTE seems to be fairly constant, or even increasing.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline: recommendations for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer.

            To develop guideline recommendations for the use of anticoagulation in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. A comprehensive systematic review of the medical literature on the prevention and treatment of VTE in cancer patients was conducted and reviewed by a panel of content and methodology experts. Following discussion of the results, the panel drafted recommendations for the use of anticoagulation in patients with malignant disease. The results of randomized controlled trials of primary and secondary VTE medical prophylaxis, surgical prophylaxis, VTE treatment, and the impact of anticoagulation on survival of patients with cancer were reviewed. Recommendations were developed on the prevention of VTE in hospitalized, ambulatory, and surgical cancer patients as well as patients with established VTE, and for use of anticoagulants in cancer patients without VTE to improve survival. Recommendations of the American Society of Clinical Oncology VTE Guideline Panel include (1) all hospitalized cancer patients should be considered for VTE prophylaxis with anticoagulants in the absence of bleeding or other contraindications; (2) routine prophylaxis of ambulatory cancer patients with anticoagulation is not recommended, with the exception of patients receiving thalidomide or lenalidomide; (3) patients undergoing major surgery for malignant disease should be considered for pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis; (4) low molecular weight heparin represents the preferred agent for both the initial and continuing treatment of cancer patients with established VTE; and (5) the impact of anticoagulants on cancer patient survival requires additional study and cannot be recommended at present.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Cancer and Venous Thromboembolic Disease: A Review.

              Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with cancer are six times more likely to develop VTE than their noncancer counterparts, and VTE is the second leading cause of death in cancer patients. Despite the publication of major consensus guidelines setting out recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients, there remains a gulf between these guidelines and clinical practice. In general, thromboprophylaxis is recommended for most patients hospitalized with active cancer. Furthermore, outpatient thromboprophylaxis may be used in carefully selected high-risk ambulatory patients. Certain areas of controversy still remain. Although low-molecular-weight heparin has been shown to be superior to vitamin K antagonists in cancer patients, the role of direct oral anticoagulants is still uncertain. Moreover, recurrent thromboembolism, bleeding, and thrombocytopenia are frequently seen in cancer patients. Optimal anticoagulation in such instances presents a major challenge to clinicians. Modern computed tomography techniques have resulted in an increase in the detection of "incidental" VTE. Despite a growing body of evidence promulgating standard anticoagulant treatment in such cases, these cases present further challenges for members of the multidisciplinary team. The Oncologist 2017;22:199-207Implications for Practice: This article discusses venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with malignancy. Practical guidance is offered on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat VTE in cancer patients. The management of "challenging" cases of VTE is also discussed.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Oncology Practice
                JOP
                American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
                1554-7477
                1935-469X
                December 2019
                December 2019
                : 15
                : 12
                : 661-664
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
                [2 ]American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA
                [3 ]University of Milan Bicocca and Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy
                Article
                10.1200/JOP.19.00368
                © 2019
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article