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      A preliminary study of autism and cybercrime in the context of international law enforcement

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          – The purpose of this paper is to explore the association of cybercrime, autistic spectrum conditions and international law enforcement, the past decade having seen a significant growth in reported cybercrimes involving autistic individuals.

          Design/methodology/approach

          – Interest in the profile of autism and cybercrime and the pathways whereby such offences are committed is shared by key law-enforcement agencies worldwide. This was explored by literature review and survey.

          Findings

          – The authors identified a presence of persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders but no empirical evidence to suggest a prevalence or an over representation of autistic individuals committing cybercrime offences. At present profiling, pathways, and recording is under developed.

          Research limitations/implications

          – Paucity of literature on cybercrime and autism. Awareness of autism within law-enforcement agencies and the absence of key diagnostic and other data from the cross-section of agencies surveyed.

          Practical implications

          – Improve detection, diversion, profiling, risk and pathways into cybercrime.

          Social implications

          – Better prediction of risk of cybercrime and improved responses.

          Originality/value

          – Original paper believed to be the first to look at cybercrime and ASD in the context of international law enforcement.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
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          The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)--adolescent version.

          The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) quantifies autistic traits in adults. This paper adapted the AQ for children (age 9.8-15.4 years). Three groups of participants were assessed: Group 1: n=52 adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA); Group 2: n=79 adolescents with classic autism; and Group 3, n=50 controls. The adolescents with AS/HFA did not differ significantly from the adolescents with autism but both clinical groups scored higher than controls. Approximately 90% of the adolescents with AS/HFA and autism scored 30+, vs. none of the controls. Among the controls, boys scored higher than girls. The AQ can rapidly quantify where an adolescent is situated on the continuum from autism to normality.
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            Psychological Disorder in Adolescents and Adults with Asperger Syndrome

             D. Tantam (2000)
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              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevalence of Asperger's syndrome in a secure hospital.

              The hypothesis that Asperger's syndrome (AS) may go unrecognised in forensic populations was examined by ascertaining the prevalence in Broadmoor Special Hospital. The entire male patient population was screened by examination of case notes. Identified cases were subject to the next stage of the study, which involved observation and interviewing of patients, and a semi-structured interview of key staff. A prevalence of 1.5% (0.6% to 3.3%, 95% CI) was found. The addition of equivocal cases increased the prevalence to 2.3%. The prevalence of AS in Broadmoor Hospital is greater than that reported for the general population.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                AIA
                10.1108/AIA
                Advances in Autism
                Emerald Publishing
                2056-3868
                30 July 2015
                30 July 2015
                : 1
                : 1
                : 2-11
                Affiliations
                Centre for CyberSecurity, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
                Research Autism, London, United Kingdom AND Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom AND CASD, Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
                Article
                AIA-05-2015-0003.pdf
                10.1108/AIA-05-2015-0003
                © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
                Product
                Categories
                Articles
                General review
                Health & social care
                Learning & intellectual disabilities
                Custom metadata
                yes
                yes
                JOURNAL
                included

                Health & Social care

                Asperger syndrome, Cybercrime, Law enforcement, Profiling, Criminal justice, Autism

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