66
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Bones on Stones

      1

      Archaeology International

      Ubiquity Press

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Death's Heads, Cherubs, and Willow Trees: Experimental Archaeology in Colonial Cemeteries

          Seventeenth and eighteenth-century gravestones in Massachusetts are decorated with a traditional set of designs which have distinctive spatial and temporal limits. By treating them as archaeological phenomena, one can demonstrate and test methods of inferring diffusion, design evolution, and relationships between a folk-art tradition and the culture which produced it. Early popularity of death's-head designs reflects Puritan attitudes toward death, while the later cherub, willow tree, and urn motifs indicate the breakdown of these values. Although cherubs appear earliest among an innovating urban class in Cambridge, they remain a relatively minor type in this central area but are rapidly adopted in outlying districts further removed from the center of influence. Imperfect reproduction of certain designs gives rise to distinctive local styles of other areas. The distribution of these local styles in time and space provides further insights regarding religious change in the Colonial period, including a clear indication of how this change proceeded in different geographical areas at different times. Future analysis of this material promises to be quite productive in the areas of experimental archaeology, kinship analysis, demographic studies, style change, and religious change in Colonial America.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The life of the corpse: division and dissection in late medieval Europe.

             K. Park (1995)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

              (2013)
              The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland have scanned the entire run of the Archaeologia Scotica and the Society's out-of-print monographs. The archive also includes a full run of the Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland from 1851 until 2012. The latest editions of the journal are available digitally, although they are embargoed for three years, during which time they are only available to Fellows of the society using a login and password.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2048-4194
                Archaeology International
                Ubiquity Press
                2048-4194
                14 December 2017
                2017
                : 20
                : 85-90
                Affiliations
                [1 ]UCL Institute of Archaeology, London, WC1H 0PY, UK
                Article
                10.5334/ai-349
                Copyright: © 2017 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Research update

                Archaeology, Cultural studies

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                Archaeology International
                Volume 20,

                Similar content 1,257

                Most referenced authors 26