Blog
About

15
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Decoupling of the minority PhD talent pool and assistant professor hiring in medical school basic science departments in the US

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Faculty diversity is a longstanding challenge in the US. However, we lack a quantitative and systemic understanding of how the career transitions into assistant professor positions of PhD scientists from underrepresented minority (URM) and well-represented (WR) racial/ethnic backgrounds compare. Between 1980 and 2013, the number of PhD graduates from URM backgrounds increased by a factor of 9.3, compared with a 2.6-fold increase in the number of PhD graduates from WR groups. However, the number of scientists from URM backgrounds hired as assistant professors in medical school basic science departments was not related to the number of potential candidates (R 2=0.12, p>0.07), whereas there was a strong correlation between these two numbers for scientists from WR backgrounds (R 2=0.48, p<0.0001). We built and validated a conceptual system dynamics model based on these data that explained 79% of the variance in the hiring of assistant professors and posited no hiring discrimination. Simulations show that, given current transition rates of scientists from URM backgrounds to faculty positions, faculty diversity would not increase significantly through the year 2080 even in the context of an exponential growth in the population of PhD graduates from URM backgrounds, or significant increases in the number of faculty positions. Instead, the simulations showed that diversity increased as more postdoctoral candidates from URM backgrounds transitioned onto the market and were hired.

          DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21393.001

          Related collections

          Most cited references 55

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws.

          The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession--and making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches. Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental features of the US biomedical research ecosystem.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Book: not found

            How Economics Shapes Science

             Paula Stephan (2012)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Toward a Model of Social Influence that Explains Minority Student Integration into the Scientific Community.

              Students from several ethnic minority groups are underrepresented in the sciences, such that minority students more frequently drop out of the scientific career path than non-minority students. Viewed from a perspective of social influence, this pattern suggests that minority students do not integrate into the scientific community at the same rate as non-minority students. Kelman (1958, 2006) describes a tripartite integration model of social influence (TIMSI) by which a person orients to a social system. To test if this model predicts integration into the scientific community, we conducted analyses of data from a national panel of minority science students. A structural equation model framework showed that self-efficacy (operationalized consistent with Kelman's 'rule-orientation') predicted student intentions to pursue a scientific career. However, when identification as a scientist and internalization of values are added to the model, self-efficacy becomes a poorer predictor of intention. Additional mediation analyses support the conclusion that while having scientific self-efficacy is important, identifying with and endorsing the values of the social system reflect a deeper integration and more durable motivation to persist as a scientist.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Reviewing editor
                Journal
                eLife
                Elife
                eLife
                eLife
                eLife
                eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
                2050-084X
                17 November 2016
                2016
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]deptOffice of Program Planning, Analysis and Evaluation , National Institute of General Medical Sciences , Bethesda, United States
                [2 ]deptPublic Health and Diversity Initiative , Association of American Medical Colleges , Washington, United States
                [3 ]deptDepartment of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering , The George Washington University , Washington, United States
                eLife , United Kingdom
                eLife , United Kingdom
                Author notes
                Article
                21393
                10.7554/eLife.21393
                5153246
                27852433

                This is an open-access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

                Product
                Funding
                No external funding was received for this work.
                Categories
                Research
                Feature Article
                Custom metadata
                2.5
                A systems-level analysis of the biomedical workforce in the US shows that current strategies to enhance faculty diversity are unlikely to have a significant impact, and that there is a need to increase the number of PhDs from underrepresented minority backgrounds who move on to postdoctoral positions.

                Life sciences

                none, postdoc, grad school, nih, science policy, workforce diversity, careers in science

                Comments

                Comment on this article