8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      On conceptualizing self-control as more than the effortful inhibition of impulses.

      Personality and social psychology review : an official journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc

      Internal-External Control, Models, Psychological, Motivation, Humans, psychology, Impulsive Behavior, Cognition, Inhibition (Psychology)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The notion that self-control entails effortful inhibition of impulses dominates prevailing psychological models of self-control. This article describes some of the conceptual and empirical limitations of defining self-control as the effortful inhibition of impulses. The present article instead advocates for a dual-motive conceptualization, which describes self-control as the process of advancing distal rather than proximal motivations when the two compete. Effortful impulse inhibition in this model represents only one of many means by which people promote their self-control efforts. Adopting a dual-motive approach offers new insight and proposes several new research directions. This article discusses these implications and calls for psychologists to reconsider the way self-control is currently understood.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          21685152
          10.1177/1088868311411165

          Comments

          Comment on this article