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      A revision of the giant Amazonian ants of the genus Dinoponera (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

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      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Dinoponera Roger 1861 has been revised several times. However, species limits remain questionable due to limited collection and undescribed males. We re-evaluate the species boundaries based on workers and known males. We describe the new species Dinoponera hispida from Tucuruí, Pará, Brazil and Dinoponera snellingi from Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil and describe the male of Dinoponera longipes Emery 1901. Additionally, we report numerous range extensions with updated distribution maps and provide keys in English, Spanish and Portuguese for workers and known males of Dinoponera.

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          Most cited references 32

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          Phylogeny of the ants: diversification in the age of angiosperms.

           C. Moreau (2006)
          We present a large-scale molecular phylogeny of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), based on 4.5 kilobases of sequence data from six gene regions extracted from 139 of the 288 described extant genera, representing 19 of the 20 subfamilies. All but two subfamilies are recovered as monophyletic. Divergence time estimates calibrated by minimum age constraints from 43 fossils indicate that most of the subfamilies representing extant ants arose much earlier than previously proposed but only began to diversify during the Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene. This period also witnessed the rise of angiosperms and most herbivorous insects.
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            Systema entomologiae : sistens insectorvm classes, ordines, genera, species, adiectis synonymis, locis, descriptionibvs, observationibvs / Io. Christ. Fabricii.

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              Pretender punishment induced by chemical signalling in a queenless ant.

              Animal societies are stages for both conflict and cooperation. Reproduction is often monopolized by one or a few individuals who behave aggressively to prevent subordinates from reproducing (for example, naked mole-rats, wasps and ants). Here we report an unusual mechanism by which the dominant individual maintains reproductive control. In the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps, only the alpha female reproduces. If the alpha is challenged by another female she chemically marks the pretender who is then punished by low-ranking females. This cooperation between alpha and low-rankers allows the alpha to inflict punishment indirectly, thereby maintaining her reproductive primacy without having to fight.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                March 20 2013
                March 20 2013
                : 31
                : 119-164
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.31.4335
                © 2013
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