Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Costs of management of occupational exposures to blood and body fluids.

      Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology

      University of Chicago Press

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To determine the cost of management of occupational exposures to blood and body fluids.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Hepatitis C virus infection in medical personnel after needlestick accident.

          Hepatitis C virus infections in medical personnel after needlestick accidents have been documented generally by detection of seroconversion to a hepatitis C virus nonstructural region antigen, c100-3 (a marker of infection). We tested for hepatitis C virus core-derived antibodies and genomic RNA in addition to c100-3 antibody in 159 cases of needlestick exposure that did not involve patients positive for HBsAg. Of these we found 68 cases with index patients positive for both hepatitis C virus RNA and antibodies and members negative for antibodies to HCV core or c100-3 before the needlestick accidents. Seven of these medical personnel became infected with hepatitis C virus after the accidents. Their hepatitis was generally subclinical or self-limited and transient, except for one patient in whom liver enzyme elevation persisted along with the antibodies. In our study, the risk of hepatitis C virus transmission from a single needlestick accident with hepatitis C virus RNA-positive blood was 10%, considerably higher than the 4% estimated in a previous study. We found that donor blood with antibody to an hepatitis C virus core-derived peptide with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay optical densities greater than 2.0 carried a significant risk of transmitting hepatitis C virus to needlestick victims. No hepatitis C virus seroconversions occurred in medical personnel exposed to hepatitis C virus antibody-negative or hepatitis C virus RNA-negative blood; however, one such exposure resulted in a very mild non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Rates of needle-stick injury caused by various devices in a university hospital.

            We identified characteristics of devices that caused needle-stick injuries in a university hospital over a 10-month period. Hospital employees who reported needle sticks were interviewed about the types of devices causing injury and the circumstances of the injuries. Of 326 injuries studied, disposable syringes accounted for 35 percent, intravenous tubing and needle assemblies for 26 percent, prefilled cartridge syringes for 12 percent, winged steel-needle intravenous sets for 7 percent, phlebotomy needles for 5 percent, intravenous catheter stylets for 2 percent, and other devices for 13 percent. When the data were corrected for the number of each type of device purchased, disposable syringes had the lowest rate of needle sticks (6.9 per 100,000 syringes purchased). Devices that required disassembly had rates of injury of up to 5.3 times the rate for disposable syringes. One third of the injuries were related to recapping. Competing hazards were often cited as reasons for recapping. They included the risk of disassembling a device with an uncapped, contaminated needle and the difficulty of safely carrying several uncapped items to a disposal box in a single trip. New designs could provide safer methods for covering contaminated needles. Devices should be designed so that the worker's hands remain behind the needle as it is covered, the needle should be covered before disassembly of the device, and the needle should remain covered after disposal. Such improvements could reduce the incentives for recapping needles and lower the risk of needle-stick injuries among health care workers.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Estimate of the annual number of percutaneous injuries among hospital-based healthcare workers in the United States, 1997-1998.

               ,  Janine Jagger,   (2004)
              To construct a single estimate of the number of percutaneous injuries sustained annually by healthcare workers (HCWs) in the United States. Statistical analysis. We combined data collected in 1997 and 1998 at 15 National Surveillance System for Health Care Workers (NaSH) hospitals and 45 Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet) hospitals. The combined data, taken as a sample of all U.S. hospitals, were adjusted for underreporting. The estimate of the number of percutaneous injuries nationwide was obtained by weighting the number of percutaneous injuries at each hospital by the number of admissions in all U.S. hospitals relative to the number of admissions at that hospital. The estimated number of percutaneous injuries sustained annually by hospital-based HCWs was 384,325 (95% confidence interval, 311,091 to 463,922). The number of percutaneous injuries sustained by HCWs outside of the hospital setting was not estimated. Although our estimate is smaller than some previously published estimates of percutaneous injuries among HCWs, its magnitude remains a concern and emphasizes the urgent need to implement prevention strategies. In addition, improved surveillance could be used to monitor injury trends in all healthcare settings and evaluate the impact of prevention interventions.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1086/518729
                17564978

                Comments

                Comment on this article