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      Serum transthyretin level is associated with clinical severity rather than nutrition status in massively burned patients.

      JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

      SAGE Publications

      transthyretin, severity, burn, nutrition

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          Abstract

          The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical significance of serum transthyretin (TTR) in massively burned patients in nutrition support and clinical severity.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Hepatic proteins and nutrition assessment.

          Serum hepatic protein (albumin, transferrin, and prealbumin) levels have historically been linked in clinical practice to nutritional status. This paradigm can be traced to two conventional categories of malnutrition: kwashiorkor and marasmus. Explanations for both of these conditions evolved before knowledge of the inflammatory processes of acute and chronic illness were known. Substantial literature on the inflammatory process and its effects on hepatic protein metabolism has replaced previous reports suggesting that nutritional status and protein intake are the significant correlates with serum hepatic protein levels. Compelling evidence suggests that serum hepatic protein levels correlate with morbidity and mortality. Thus, serum hepatic protein levels are useful indicators of severity of illness. They help identify those who are the most likely to develop malnutrition, even if well nourished prior to trauma or the onset of illness. Furthermore, hepatic protein levels do not accurately measure nutritional repletion. Low serum levels indicate that a patient is very ill and probably requires aggressive and closely monitored medical nutrition therapy.
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            Lactate clearance and survival following injury.

            Previous reports cite optimization of O2 delivery (DO2) to 660 mL/min/m2, O2 consumption (VO2) to 170 mL/min/m2, and cardiac index (CI) of 4.5 L/min as predicting survival. We prospectively evaluated 76 consecutive patients with multiple trauma admitted directly to the ICU from the operating room or emergency department. Patients had serum lactate levels and oxygen transport measured on ICU admission and at 8, 16, 24, 36, and 48 hours. Patients were analyzed with respect to survival (S) versus nonsurvival (NS), lactate clearance to normal (< or = 2 mmol/L) by 24 and 48 hours, hemodynamic optimization as defined above, as well as Injury Severity Score (ISS), ICU stay (LOS), and admission blood pressure. All patients achieved non-flow-dependent VO2. There was no difference in CI, DO2, VO2, or ISS when S was compared with NS. All 27 patients whose lactate level normalized in 24 hours survived. If lactate levels cleared to normal between 24 and 48 hours, the survival rate was 75%. Only 3 of the 22 patients who did not clear their lactate level to normal by 48 hours survived. Ten of the 25 nonsurvivors (40%) achieved the above arbitrary optimization criteria. Fifteen of the survivors never achieved any of these criteria. Optimization alone does not predict survival. However, the time needed to normalize serum lactate levels is an important prognostic factor for survival in severely injured patients.
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              C-reactive protein: a valuable marker of sepsis.

               Pedro Póvoa (2002)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                23976768
                10.1177/0148607113499588

                transthyretin, severity, burn, nutrition

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