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      Clonal Vγ6+Vδ4+ T cells promote IL-17–mediated immunity against Staphylococcus aureus skin infection

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          Abstract

          T cell cytokines contribute to immunity against Staphylococcus aureus, but the predominant T cell subsets involved are unclear. In an S. aureus skin infection mouse model, we found that the IL-17 response was mediated by γδ T cells, which trafficked from lymph nodes to the infected skin to induce neutrophil recruitment, proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF, and host defense peptides. RNA-seq for TRG and TRD sequences in lymph nodes and skin revealed a single clonotypic expansion of the encoded complementarity-determining region 3 amino acid sequence, which could be generated by canonical nucleotide sequences of TRGV5 or TRGV6 and TRDV4. However, only TRGV6 and TRDV4 but not TRGV5 sequences expanded. Finally, Vγ6 + T cells were a predominant γδ T cell subset that produced IL-17A as well as IL-22, TNF, and IFNγ, indicating a broad and substantial role for clonal Vγ6 +Vδ4 + T cells in immunity against S. aureus skin infections.

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          Most cited references 85

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          Staphylococcus aureus infections: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

          Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions.
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            Community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

            Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in hospitals worldwide, and causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Health-care-associated MRSA infections arise in individuals with predisposing risk factors, such as surgery or presence of an indwelling medical device. By contrast, many community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections arise in otherwise healthy individuals who do not have such risk factors. Additionally, CA-MRSA infections are epidemic in some countries. These features suggest that CA-MRSA strains are more virulent and transmissible than are traditional hospital-associated MRSA strains. The restricted treatment options for CA-MRSA infections compound the effect of enhanced virulence and transmission. Although progress has been made towards understanding emergence of CA-MRSA, virulence, and treatment of infections, our knowledge remains incomplete. Here we review the most up-to-date knowledge and provide a perspective for the future prophylaxis or new treatments for CA-MRSA infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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              T helper 17 lineage differentiation is programmed by orphan nuclear receptors ROR alpha and ROR gamma.

              T cell functional differentiation is mediated by lineage-specific transcription factors. T helper 17 (Th17) has been recently identified as a distinct Th lineage mediating tissue inflammation. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR gamma) was shown to regulate Th17 differentiation; ROR gamma deficiency, however, did not completely abolish Th17 cytokine expression. Here, we report Th17 cells highly expressed another related nuclear receptor, ROR alpha, induced by transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is dependent on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Overexpression of ROR alpha promoted Th17 differentiation, possibly through the conserved noncoding sequence 2 in Il17-Il17f locus. ROR alpha deficiency resulted in reduced IL-17 expression in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, ROR alpha and ROR gamma coexpression synergistically led to greater Th17 differentiation. Double deficiencies in ROR alpha and ROR gamma globally impaired Th17 generation and completely protected mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, Th17 differentiation is directed by two lineage-specific nuclear receptors, ROR alpha and ROR gamma.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                May 14 2019
                : 201818256
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.1818256116
                6561199
                31088972
                © 2019

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                https://www.pnas.org/site/aboutpnas/licenses.xhtml

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