4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      ‘Heavy Fog in the Channel — Continent Cut Off’: Reform of Upper-Secondary Education from the Perspective of English Exceptionalism

      1 , 1

      European Educational Research Journal

      Symposium Journals

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Recent international studies in upper-secondary education (USE) have highlighted the importance and complexities of this phase as it becomes a more universal experience. Here the authors examine recent trends in USE to provide a context for discussion of the English system, which has been moving from a ‘linked’ to a more ‘tracked’ approach since 2010 through a combination of factors that make it ‘exceptionalist’. They suggest that this change has not been adequately captured in crossnational studies because of its recent nature and because analysis of USE systems has not sufficiently appreciated the multi-dimensional character of this phase of education as it expands. They argue that the wider global trends and pressures in USE are towards integration and unification rather than segregation and tracking. In this context they explore a four-dimensional integrated/unified model for the English USE system that might bring it closer to other systems in the UK and in Europe, thus reducing its exceptionalism and dispelling the ‘fog in the Channel’. They conclude the article by arguing that as USE systems expand and become more universal, they require a multi-dimensional analysis, and the model discussed here may be appropriate more widely.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 51

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Education plc

           Stephen Ball (2007)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Vocational Upper-Secondary Education and the Transition from School

             D. Raffe,  C. Iannelli (2006)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Thirty years of 14–19 education and training in England: reflections on policy, curriculum and organisation

              This article traces and analyses some of the key features of 14–19 education and training in England over the 30 years since such a phase was first mooted. It does this through an introductory narrative outlining the key policies and initiatives and the development of six themes drawing on analysis of a body of research and policy. The themes are: the waxing and waning of policy in relation to a 14–19 phase; policy imperatives driving 14–19 education and training; curricular commonality, differentiation and unification; pathways and progression; qualifications-led curriculum change and partnership, institutional autonomy and competition. The article concludes by outlining the implications of the analysis for the current political and policy context in relation to education and training for 14- to 19-year-olds.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Educational Research Journal
                European Educational Research Journal
                Symposium Journals
                1474-9041
                1474-9041
                December 2014
                January 01 2014
                December 2014
                : 13
                : 6
                : 683-698
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Education, University of London, United Kingdom
                Article
                10.2304/eerj.2014.13.6.683
                60657f2d-aeea-4bf7-8279-422d429afe8f
                © 2014

                Comments

                Comment on this article