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      Ethnopharmacologic survey of medicinal plants used to treat human diseases by traditional medical practitioners in Dega Damot district, Amhara, Northwestern Ethiopia

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          Abstract

          Background

          One of the services that plants provide for human beings is their wider medicinal application. Although it is not fully assessed, the practice and wider use of traditional medicine is frequent in Ethiopia. Studies conducted previously are confined to the perceptions of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine. A total of 45 informants were selected purposefully from the study area. For collecting the data, semi-structured interviewees, observation and field walks were employed from August 10 to September 30/2014. To summarize the information, descriptive statistical methods were applied.

          Results

          Sixty species of medicinal plants distributed in 42 families were collected and identified applied locally for the treatment of 55 human disorders. The most commonly treated ones were evil eye, malaria, wound, peptic ulcer disease and rabies. According to this study, leaves were the commonly used plant parts (36.5%) and 39% of the preparations were decoctions. Oral route, 43 (44%) was the commonly used route of application whereas most (54.8%) remedies were administered only once. Fourteen percent of preparations caused vomiting in addition most (40.4%) of the formulations was contraindicated for pregnant patients. Only seventeen percent of the formulations possessed drug food interactions. Most preparations were stored within clothes, 31 (29.8%). There exists a high (ICF = 0.8) evenness of plant use among healers for treating respiratory problems. Alliumsativum (FI = 0.75) for evil eye, Phytolacca dodecandra (FI = 0.8) for rabies and Croton macrostachyus (FI = 0.78) for treating malaria were medicinal plants with highest fidelity levels showing consistency of knowledge on species best treating power. This study also documented that drought, overgrazing and firewood collection are major threats.

          Conclusion

          Dega Damot district is loaded in its medicinal plant diversity and indigenous knowledge though plants are highly affected by drought, overgrazing and firewood collection. Therefore awareness activities must be created among the district’s population by concerned governmental and nongovernmental organizations about the value of medicinal plants and conservation of these plants. The healing potential and associated adverse issues of the claimed medicinal plants should be assessed before proposing for a broader utilization.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13104-017-2482-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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          Most cited references26

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          Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal herbs in Israel, the Golan Heights and the West Bank region.

          An extensive ethnopharmacological survey was conducted among the most well known Arabic indigenous herbal practitioners in Israel, the Golan Heights and the West Bank in order to evaluate the potential of local plants used in treating different diseases and illnesses. Thirty-one indigenous practitioners' of Arabic traditional medicine ranging in age from 40 to 116 years, were interviewed using a previously prepared questionnaire. The current survey revealed that 129 plant species are still in use in Arabic traditional medicine for the treatments of various diseases. Among these plants, there are 40 species used for treating skin diseases, 27 species for treating kidney and urinary system, 26 species for treating diabetes, 23 species for treating digestive system including stomach and intestinal pain and inflammation, 22 species for treating liver diseases, 16 species for treating respiratory system and coughing, 13 species for treating forms of cancer and nine species for treating weight loss and cholesterol reduction. Additional findings and implications of this current survey including preparation methods and route of use are discussed in this report.
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            An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in Wayu Tuka District, East Welega Zone of Oromia Regional State, West Ethiopia

            Background This paper reports an ethnobotanical study that focused on the traditional medicinal plants used by local communities to treat human and livestock ailments. A cross-sectional study was undertaken from September 2009 to June 2010 in Wayu Tuka District of Oromia Region, Ethiopia. The aim of the study is to document medicinal plants used by local people of the study area and the threats currently affecting medicinal plants. Methods Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, field observations and group discussion in which 63 (41 men & 22 women) randomly selected informants participated. Of which, 11 (10 male and 1 female) were local healers. Paired comparison method, direct matrix ranking and Informant consensus factors (ICF) were used to analyze the importance of some plant species. Results A total of 126 medicinal plant species, distributed in 108 genera and 56 families, were collected together with their medicinal uses. Of the 126 species of medicinal plants collected from the study area, eighty six (68%) were obtained from the wild whereas thirty three (26%) were from homegardens. The Fabaceae came out as a leading family with 15 medicinal species while the Solanaceae followed with eight species. Seventy eight (62%) of the medicinal plants were reported as being used for treating human ailments, 23 (18.2%) for the treatment of livestock ailments and 25 (20%) for both. The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (43%), followed by roots (18.5%) while crushing, which accounted for (29%) and powdering (28%) were the widely used methods of preparation of traditional herbal medicines. Conclusion The number of reported medicinal plants and their uses by the local people of the District indicate the depth of the local indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants and their application. The documented medicinal plants can serve as a basis for future investigation of modern drug.
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              Ethnomedicinal study of plants used by Sheko ethnic group of Ethiopia.

              This study was conducted to document and evaluate knowledge on medicinal plant use by Sheko ethnic group in Southwest Ethiopia. Interviews and ranking exercises were the main methods employed to collect the ethnobotanical data. Fidelity level (FL) values were calculated for claimed Sheko medicinal plants to estimate their healing potentials. Seventy-one Sheko medicinal plants were reported, the majority of which were used to treat skin and gastro-intestinal ailments. Ocimum lamiifolium, Phytolacca dodecandra, Amaranthus dubius and Amaranthus graecizans were the medicinal plants assigned with the highest FL values, a possible indication of their better healing potential. The majority of Sheko medicinal plants were found to be herbs, and leaf was the most preferred plant part in remedy preparations. The study indicated that men, older people and illiterate ones had better knowledge of medicinal plants use as compared to women, younger people and literate ones, respectively. The study showed that the Sheko people have rich knowledge of medicinal plant use. This knowledge is however, currently threatened mainly due to acculturation. Awareness should thus be created among Sheko community by concerned bodies regarding the usefulness of their medical practice. The efficacy and safety of the claimed medicinal plants need to be evaluated before recommending them for a wider use with priority given to those with high fidelity level values. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                mulukenwubetu1986@gmail.com
                abula_tefera@yahoo.com
                dgetiye@gmail.com
                Journal
                BMC Res Notes
                BMC Res Notes
                BMC Research Notes
                BioMed Central (London )
                1756-0500
                18 April 2017
                18 April 2017
                2017
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.449044.9, Pharmacy Department, , Debre Markos University, ; Gojjam, Ethiopia
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 1250 5688, GRID grid.7123.7, School of Pharmacy, , Addis Ababa University, ; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
                [3 ]GRID grid.449044.9, Public Health Department, , Debre Markos University, ; Gojjam, Ethiopia
                Article
                2482
                10.1186/s13104-017-2482-3
                5395840
                28420410
                606cd998-9de0-4be0-802b-bbb446620899
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Medicine
                medicinal plants,traditional medical practitioner,ethnopharmaclogy
                Medicine
                medicinal plants, traditional medical practitioner, ethnopharmaclogy

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