6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Beyond Broadway: Analysis of Qualitative Characteristics of and Individual Responses to Creatively Able, a Music and Movement Intervention for Children with Autism

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Movement in response to music represents one of the natural social environments in which physical activity occurs. The study of music and movement, including dance, requires a careful, holistic consideration of many features, which may include music, physical activity, motor learning, social engagement, emotion, and creativity. The overarching goal of this manuscript is to examine qualitative characteristics of and individual responses to a music and movement intervention (Creatively Able) for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We provide a description of Creatively Able, illustrating how the program design and physical and social environment were informed by children’s needs and preferences in order to provide an enriched environment in which to promote multiple systems in children with ASD. Using data from two pilot studies with 20 children with ASD, we illustrate how researchers can use observational research methods to measure important aspects of the social environment (e.g., children’s engagement during intervention sessions) as well as engagement of potential underlying behavioral mechanisms (e.g., self-regulation) that might reduce clinical symptoms. We further illustrate how individual responses to intervention (e.g., improvements in behaviors or symptoms) can be studied in physically active interventions. Our pilot study results showed group-level reductions in Stereotyped and Compulsive behaviors of 8% and 4%, respectively; posthoc analysis revealed that there were substantial individual differences in children’s responses to the intervention. This research illustrates robust methods that can be applied to intervention research to improve our understanding of important features of interventions that might help promote development in various domains, including executive functions and self-regulation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Early behavioral intervention, brain plasticity, and the prevention of autism spectrum disorder.

          Advances in the fields of cognitive and affective developmental neuroscience, developmental psychopathology, neurobiology, genetics, and applied behavior analysis have contributed to a more optimistic outcome for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These advances have led to new methods for early detection and more effective treatments. For the first time, prevention of ASD is plausible. Prevention will entail detecting infants at risk before the full syndrome is present and implementing treatments designed to alter the course of early behavioral and brain development. This article describes a developmental model of risk, risk processes, symptom emergence, and adaptation in ASD that offers a framework for understanding early brain plasticity in ASD and its role in prevention of the disorder.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale: Two Validation Studies

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Enhancing Students' Engagement by Increasing Teachers' Autonomy Support

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                Int J Environ Res Public Health
                ijerph
                International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
                MDPI
                1661-7827
                1660-4601
                17 April 2019
                April 2019
                : 16
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
                [2 ]School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland; ross.neville@ 123456ucd.ie
                [3 ]Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA; svazou@ 123456iastate.edu
                [4 ]Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92617, USA; Sabrina@ 123456uci.edu (S.E.B.S.); kkrishn1@ 123456uci.edu (K.K.); ireneg1@ 123456uci.edu (I.G.); kmguzma1@ 123456uci.edu (K.G.); atavakou@ 123456uci.edu (A.T.); astehli@ 123456uci.edu (A.S.)
                [5 ]Graduate School of Education, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA; Katherine.Stavropoulos@ 123456ucr.edu
                [6 ]Clare Trevor School of Arts, University of California, Irvine, CA 92617, USA; palermoa@ 123456uci.edu
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: klakes@ 123456medsch.ucr.edu
                Article
                ijerph-16-01377
                10.3390/ijerph16081377
                6517971
                30999560
                © 2019 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article