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      Acceptability of a COVID-19 Vaccine among Adults in the United States: How Many People Would Get Vaccinated?

      research-article
      * , ,
      Vaccine
      Elsevier Ltd.
      Coronavirus, COVID-19, Vaccine, Adults

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          Abstract

          Background

          Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. Several prophylactic vaccines against COVID-19 are currently in development, yet little is known about people’s acceptability of a COVID-19 vaccine.

          Methods

          We conducted an online survey of adults ages 18 and older in the United States ( n=2,006) in May 2020. Multivariable relative risk regression identified correlates of participants’ willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine ( i.e., vaccine acceptability).

          Results

          Overall, 69% of participants were willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Participants were more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they thought their healthcare provider would recommend vaccination (RR=1.73, 95% CI: 1.49–2.02) or if they were moderate (RR=1.09, 95% CI: 1.02–1.16) or liberal (RR=1.14, 95% CI: 1.07–1.22) in their political leaning. Participants were also more likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they reported higher levels of perceived likelihood getting a COVID-19 infection in the future (RR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09), perceived severity of COVID-19 infection (RR=1.08, 95% CI: 1.04–1.11), or perceived effectiveness of a COVID-19 vaccine (RR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.40–1.52). Participants were less likely to be willing to get vaccinated if they were non-Latinx black (RR=0.81, 95% CI: 0.74–0.90) or reported a higher level of perceived potential vaccine harms (RR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.98).

          Conclusions

          Many adults are willing to get a COVID-19 vaccine, though acceptability should be monitored as vaccine development continues. Our findings can help guide future efforts to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptability (and uptake if a vaccine becomes available).

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          Vaccine
          Vaccine
          Vaccine
          Elsevier Ltd.
          0264-410X
          1873-2518
          20 August 2020
          20 August 2020
          Affiliations
          College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
          Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
          Author notes
          [* ]Corresponding author at: Division of Health Behavior and Health Promotion, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 1841 Neil Ave., Room 359B, Columbus, OH 43210. reiter.36@ 123456osu.edu
          Article
          S0264-410X(20)31084-7
          10.1016/j.vaccine.2020.08.043
          7440153
          32863069
          60c1166c-5727-469c-9d18-816b484043c1
          © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

          Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

          History
          : 29 June 2020
          : 13 August 2020
          : 17 August 2020
          Categories
          Article

          Infectious disease & Microbiology
          coronavirus,covid-19,vaccine,adults
          Infectious disease & Microbiology
          coronavirus, covid-19, vaccine, adults

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