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      UAE university students’ experiences of virtual classroom learning during Covid 19

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          Abstract

          Virtual Classroom (VC) learning approaches have recently drawn considerable attention because they have the potential to encourage student engagement to ensure active and collaborative learning. Although research on online learning has gained visibility in recent times, VC learning has not received notable attention, especially in Gulf countries like the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study examines students’ perception and experience of VC in a university in UAE during the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of its necessity and helpfulness. This research also examines the situational pressure of VC and aims to explain the reasons for its desirability and inevitability. As a current learning space beyond the conventional face-to-face classroom learning, VC learning is available in various forms and quality depending on creating opportunities for the learners’ participation. However, there are issues with VC practice too. Our analysis of survey data ( N = 334) leads to portraying autonomous learning freedom in different learning environments in VC. We argue that students may resort to VC not because of its proven effectiveness but because of the necessity to continue addressing their learning needs. This study contributes to the general understanding of the online and traditional in-person classroom learning and virtual learning resources in the teaching of English as a globally desired language.

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          Online Education: Worldwide Status, Challenges, Trends, and Implications

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            Face-to-face or face-to-screen? Undergraduates' opinions and test performance in classroom vs. online learning

            As electronic communication becomes increasingly common, and as students juggle study, work, and family life, many universities are offering their students more flexible learning opportunities. Classes once delivered face-to-face are often replaced by online activities and discussions. However, there is little research comparing students' experience and learning in these two modalities. The aim of this study was to compare undergraduates' preference for, and academic performance on, class material and assessment presented online vs. in traditional classrooms. Psychology students (N = 67) at an Australian university completed written exercises, a class discussion, and a written test on two academic topics. The activities for one topic were conducted face-to-face, and the other online, with topics counterbalanced across two groups. The results showed that students preferred to complete activities face-to-face rather than online, but there was no significant difference in their test performance in the two modalities. In their written responses, students expressed a strong preference for class discussions to be conducted face-to-face, reporting that they felt more engaged, and received more immediate feedback, than in online discussion. A follow-up study with a separate group (N = 37) confirmed that although students appreciated the convenience of completing written activities online in their own time, they also strongly preferred to discuss course content with peers in the classroom rather than online. It is concluded that online and face-to-face activities can lead to similar levels of academic performance, but that students would rather do written activities online but engage in discussion in person. Course developers could aim to structure classes so that students can benefit from both the flexibility of online learning, and the greater engagement experienced in face-to-face discussion.
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              Blended learning in higher education: Students’ perceptions and their relation to outcomes

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                monj0603@gmail.com
                nurulhijja@uitm.edu.my
                g_almurshidi@uaeu.ac.ae
                hoque.eng@daffodilvarsity.edu.bd
                karthigasv2022@gmail.com
                mohoshin.reza@pub.edu.bd
                Journal
                Smart Learn. Environ.
                Smart Learning Environments
                Springer Nature Singapore (Singapore )
                2196-7091
                12 January 2023
                12 January 2023
                2023
                : 10
                : 1
                : 5
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.11875.3a, ISNI 0000 0001 2294 3534, Universiti Sains Malaysia, ; Penang, Malaysia
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0036-7174
                Article
                225
                10.1186/s40561-023-00225-1
                9835733
                60e53063-4c07-49fe-bc0e-14369a146855
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 31 October 2022
                : 8 January 2023
                Categories
                Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2023

                virtual classroom (vc),higher education,survey, online, quantitative method

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