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Impact of improved attenuation correction on 18F-FDG PET/MR hybrid imaging of the heart

1 , * , 2 , 1 , 3

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      Abstract

      Purpose

      The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the effect of improved attenuation correction (AC) including bone segmentation and truncation correction on 18F-Fluordesoxyglucose cardiac positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging.

      Methods

      PET data of 32 cardiac PET/MR datasets were reconstructed with three different AC-maps (1. Dixon-VIBE only, 2. HUGE truncation correction and bone segmentation, 3. MLAA). The Dixon-VIBE AC-maps served as reference of reconstructed PET data. 17-segment short-axis polar plots of the left ventricle were analyzed regarding the impact of each of the three AC methods on PET quantification in cardiac PET/MR imaging. Non-AC PET images were segmented to specify the amount of truncation in the Dixon-VIBE AC-map serving as a reference. All AC-maps were evaluated for artifacts.

      Results

      Using HUGE + bone AC results in a homogeneous gain of ca. 6% and for MLAA 8% of PET signal distribution across the myocardium of the left ventricle over all patients compared to Dixon-VIBE AC only. Maximal relative differences up to 18% were observed in segment 17 (apex). The body volume truncation of -12.7 ± 7.1% compared to the segmented non-AC PET images using the Dixon-VIBE AC method was reduced to -1.9 ± 3.9% using HUGE and 7.8 ± 8.3% using MLAA. In each patient, a systematic overestimation in AC-map volume was observed when applying MLAA. Quantitative impact of artifacts showed regional differences up to 6% within single segments of the myocardium.

      Conclusions

      Improved AC including bone segmentation and truncation correction in cardiac PET/MR imaging is important to ensure best possible diagnostic quality and PET quantification. The results exhibited an overestimation of AC-map volume using MLAA, while HUGE resulted in a more realistic body contouring. Incorporation of bone segmentation into the Dixon-VIBE AC-map resulted in homogeneous gain in PET signal distribution across the myocardium. The majority of observed AC-map artifacts did not significantly affect the quantitative assessment of the myocardium.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 39

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      Standardized myocardial segmentation and nomenclature for tomographic imaging of the heart. A statement for healthcare professionals from the Cardiac Imaging Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association.

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        Performance measurements of the Siemens mMR integrated whole-body PET/MR scanner.

        The recently released Biograph mMR is the first commercially available integrated whole-body PET/MR scanner. There are considerable advantages to integrating both modalities in a single scanner that enables truly simultaneous acquisition. However, there are also concerns about the possible degradation of both PET and MR performance in an integrated system. This paper evaluates the performance of the Biograph mMR during independent and simultaneous acquisition of PET and morphologic MR data. The NEMA NU 2-2007 protocol was followed for studying the PET performance. The following measurements were performed: spatial resolution; scatter fraction, count losses, and randoms; sensitivity; accuracy of the correction for count losses and randoms; and image quality. The quality control manual of the American College of Radiology was followed for studying the MR performance. The following measurements were performed: geometric accuracy, spatial resolution, low-contrast detectability, signal-to-noise ratio, static field (B(0)) homogeneity, radiofrequency field (B(1)) homogeneity, and radiofrequency noise. An average spatial resolution of 4.3 mm in full width at half maximum was measured at 1 cm offset from the center of the field of view. The system sensitivity was 15.0 kcps/MBq along the center of the scanner. The scatter fraction was 37.9%, and the peak noise-equivalent count rate was 184 kcps at 23.1 kBq/mL. The maximum absolute value of the relative count rate error due to dead-time losses and randoms was 5.5%. The average residual error in scatter and attenuation correction was 12.1%. All MR parameters were within the tolerances defined by the American College of Radiology. B(0) inhomogeneities below 1 ppm were measured in a 120-mm radius. B(1) homogeneity and signal-to-noise ratio were equivalent to those of a standard MR scanner. No radiofrequency interference was detected. These results compare favorably with other state-of-the-art PET/CT and PET/MR scanners, indicating that the integration of the PET detectors in the MR scanner and their operation within the magnetic field do not have a perceptible impact on the overall performance. The MR subsystem performs essentially like a standalone system. However, further work is necessary to evaluate the more advanced MR applications, such as functional imaging and spectroscopy.
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          Tissue classification as a potential approach for attenuation correction in whole-body PET/MRI: evaluation with PET/CT data.

          Attenuation correction (AC) of whole-body PET data in combined PET/MRI tomographs is expected to be a technical challenge. In this study, a potential solution based on a segmented attenuation map is proposed and evaluated in clinical PET/CT cases. Segmentation of the attenuation map into 4 classes (background, lungs, fat, and soft tissue) was hypothesized to be sufficient for AC purposes. The segmentation was applied to CT-based attenuation maps from (18)F-FDG PET/CT oncologic examinations of 35 patients with 52 (18)F-FDG-avid lesions in the lungs (n = 15), bones (n = 21), and neck (n = 16). The standardized uptake values (SUVs) of the lesions were determined from PET images reconstructed with nonsegmented and segmented attenuation maps, and an experienced observer interpreted both PET images with no knowledge of the attenuation map status. The feasibility of the method was also evaluated with 2 patients who underwent both PET/CT and MRI. The use of a segmented attenuation map resulted in average SUV changes of 8% +/- 3% (mean +/- SD) for bone lesions, 4% +/- 2% for neck lesions, and 2% +/- 3% for lung lesions. The largest SUV change was 13.1%, for a lesion in the pelvic bone. There were no differences in the clinical interpretations made by the experienced observer with both types of attenuation maps. A segmented attenuation map with 4 classes derived from CT data had only a small effect on the SUVs of (18)F-FDG-avid lesions and did not change the interpretation for any patient. This approach appears to be practical and valid for MRI-based AC.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] High-Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
            [2 ] Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
            [3 ] Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany
            Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, SWITZERLAND
            Author notes

            Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7761-775X, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Software, Role: Validation, Role: Visualization, Role: Writing – original draft
            Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Validation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Investigation, Role: Project administration, Role: Supervision, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS One
            PLoS ONE
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
            1932-6203
            25 March 2019
            2019
            : 14
            : 3
            30908507
            6433217
            10.1371/journal.pone.0214095
            PONE-D-18-31953
            (Editor)
            © 2019 Lindemann et al

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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            Figures: 7, Tables: 1, Pages: 16
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            Funding
            The authors received no specific funding for this work.
            Categories
            Research Article
            Research and Analysis Methods
            Imaging Techniques
            Neuroimaging
            Positron Emission Tomography
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Neuroscience
            Neuroimaging
            Positron Emission Tomography
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Diagnostic Medicine
            Diagnostic Radiology
            Tomography
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            Medicine and Health Sciences
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            Diagnostic Radiology
            Tomography
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