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      Changes in landuse alter ant diversity, assemblage composition and dominant functional groups in African savannas

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          Habitat management to conserve natural enemies of arthropod pests in agriculture.

          Many agroecosystems are unfavorable environments for natural enemies due to high levels of disturbance. Habitat management, a form of conservation biological control, is an ecologically based approach aimed at favoring natural enemies and enhancing biological control in agricultural systems. The goal of habitat management is to create a suitable ecological infrastructure within the agricultural landscape to provide resources such as food for adult natural enemies, alternative prey or hosts, and shelter from adverse conditions. These resources must be integrated into the landscape in a way that is spatially and temporally favorable to natural enemies and practical for producers to implement. The rapidly expanding literature on habitat management is reviewed with attention to practices for favoring predators and parasitoids, implementation of habitat management, and the contributions of modeling and ecological theory to this developing area of conservation biological control. The potential to integrate the goals of habitat management for natural enemies and nature conservation is discussed.
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            Loss of functional diversity under land use intensification across multiple taxa.

            Land use intensification can greatly reduce species richness and ecosystem functioning. However, species richness determines ecosystem functioning through the diversity and values of traits of species present. Here, we analyze changes in species richness and functional diversity (FD) at varying agricultural land use intensity levels. We test hypotheses of FD responses to land use intensification in plant, bird, and mammal communities using trait data compiled for 1600+ species. To isolate changes in FD from changes in species richness we compare the FD of communities to the null expectations of FD values. In over one-quarter of the bird and mammal communities impacted by agriculture, declines in FD were steeper than predicted by species number. In plant communities, changes in FD were indistinguishable from changes in species richness. Land use intensification can reduce the functional diversity of animal communities beyond changes in species richness alone, potentially imperiling provisioning of ecosystem services.
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              Improving indicator species analysis by combining groups of sites

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biodiversity and Conservation
                Biodivers Conserv
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                0960-3115
                1572-9710
                March 2018
                November 28 2017
                March 2018
                : 27
                : 4
                : 947-965
                Article
                10.1007/s10531-017-1474-x
                6111764d-26c1-45bc-950a-e2eb0b5246c2
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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