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      Distinct roles of Rho1, Cdc42, and Cyk3 in septum formation and abscission during yeast cytokinesis

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          Abstract

          Rho1 inactivation by Cyk3 promotes primary septum formation and cleavage-furrow ingression, whereas Rho1 activation or Cdc42 inactivation promotes secondary septum formation and abscission.

          Abstract

          In yeast and animal cytokinesis, the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rho1/RhoA has an established role in formation of the contractile actomyosin ring, but its role, if any, during cleavage-furrow ingression and abscission is poorly understood. Through genetic screens in yeast, we found that either activation of Rho1 or inactivation of another small GTPase, Cdc42, promoted secondary septum (SS) formation, which appeared to be responsible for abscission. Consistent with this hypothesis, a dominant-negative Rho1 inhibited SS formation but not cleavage-furrow ingression or the concomitant actomyosin ring constriction. Moreover, Rho1 is temporarily inactivated during cleavage-furrow ingression; this inactivation requires the protein Cyk3, which binds Rho1-guanosine diphosphate via its catalytically inactive transglutaminase-like domain. Thus, unlike the active transglutaminases that activate RhoA, the multidomain protein Cyk3 appears to inhibit activation of Rho1 (and thus SS formation), while simultaneously promoting cleavage-furrow ingression through primary septum formation. This work suggests a general role for the catalytically inactive transglutaminases of fungi and animals, some of which have previously been implicated in cytokinesis.

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          Most cited references 104

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          Additional modules for versatile and economical PCR-based gene deletion and modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

          An important recent advance in the functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes is the development of the one-step PCR-mediated technique for deletion and modification of chromosomal genes. This method allows very rapid gene manipulations without requiring plasmid clones of the gene of interest. We describe here a new set of plasmids that serve as templates for the PCR synthesis of fragments that allow a variety of gene modifications. Using as selectable marker the S. cerevisiae TRP1 gene or modules containing the heterologous Schizosaccharomyces pombe his5+ or Escherichia coli kan(r) gene, these plasmids allow gene deletion, gene overexpression (using the regulatable GAL1 promoter), C- or N-terminal protein tagging [with GFP(S65T), GST, or the 3HA or 13Myc epitope], and partial N- or C-terminal deletions (with or without concomitant protein tagging). Because of the modular nature of the plasmids, they allow efficient and economical use of a small number of PCR primers for a wide variety of gene manipulations. Thus, these plasmids should further facilitate the rapid analysis of gene function in S. cerevisiae.
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            A system of shuttle vectors and yeast host strains designed for efficient manipulation of DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

            A series of yeast shuttle vectors and host strains has been created to allow more efficient manipulation of DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transplacement vectors were constructed and used to derive yeast strains containing nonreverting his3, trp1, leu2 and ura3 mutations. A set of YCp and YIp vectors (pRS series) was then made based on the backbone of the multipurpose plasmid pBLUESCRIPT. These pRS vectors are all uniform in structure and differ only in the yeast selectable marker gene used (HIS3, TRP1, LEU2 and URA3). They possess all of the attributes of pBLUESCRIPT and several yeast-specific features as well. Using a pRS vector, one can perform most standard DNA manipulations in the same plasmid that is introduced into yeast.
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              New yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors constructed with in vitro mutagenized yeast genes lacking six-base pair restriction sites.

               A Sugino,  R Gietz (1988)
              We describe the production of new alleles of the LEU2, URA3 and TRP1 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by in vitro mutagenesis. Each new allele, which lacks restriction enzyme recognition sequences found in the pUC19 multicloning site, was used to construct a unique series of yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors derived from the plasmid pUC19. For each gene a 2 mu vector (YEplac), an ARS1 CEN4 vector (YCplac) and an integrative vector (YIplac) was constructed. The features of these vectors include (i) small size; (ii) unique recognition site for each restriction enzyme found in the pUC19 multicloning site; (iii) screening for plasmids containing inserts by color assay; (iv) high plasmid yield; (v) efficient transformation of S. cerevisiae. These vectors should allow greater flexibility with regard to DNA restriction fragment manipulation and subcloning.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Cell Biol
                J. Cell Biol
                jcb
                The Journal of Cell Biology
                The Rockefeller University Press
                0021-9525
                1540-8140
                22 July 2013
                : 202
                : 2
                : 311-329
                Affiliations
                Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305
                Author notes
                Correspondence to John R. Pringle: jpringle@ 123456stanford.edu

                N. Ko’s present address is Solazyme Incorporated, South San Francisco, CA 94080.

                R. Nishihama’s present address is Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

                Article
                201302001
                10.1083/jcb.201302001
                3718969
                23878277
                © 2013 Onishi et al.

                This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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