Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Inverse spin-Hall effect induced by spin pumping in metallic system

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 46

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Spintronics: Fundamentals and applications

          Spintronics, or spin electronics, involves the study of active control and manipulation of spin degrees of freedom in solid-state systems. This article reviews the current status of this subject, including both recent advances and well-established results. The primary focus is on the basic physical principles underlying the generation of carrier spin polarization, spin dynamics, and spin-polarized transport in semiconductors and metals. Spin transport differs from charge transport in that spin is a nonconserved quantity in solids due to spin-orbit and hyperfine coupling. The authors discuss in detail spin decoherence mechanisms in metals and semiconductors. Various theories of spin injection and spin-polarized transport are applied to hybrid structures relevant to spin-based devices and fundamental studies of materials properties. Experimental work is reviewed with the emphasis on projected applications, in which external electric and magnetic fields and illumination by light will be used to control spin and charge dynamics to create new functionalities not feasible or ineffective with conventional electronics.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The emergence of spin electronics in data storage.

            Electrons have a charge and a spin, but until recently these were considered separately. In classical electronics, charges are moved by electric fields to transmit information and are stored in a capacitor to save it. In magnetic recording, magnetic fields have been used to read or write the information stored on the magnetization, which 'measures' the local orientation of spins in ferromagnets. The picture started to change in 1988, when the discovery of giant magnetoresistance opened the way to efficient control of charge transport through magnetization. The recent expansion of hard-disk recording owes much to this development. We are starting to see a new paradigm where magnetization dynamics and charge currents act on each other in nanostructured artificial materials. Ultimately, 'spin currents' could even replace charge currents for the transfer and treatment of information, allowing faster, low-energy operations: spin electronics is on its way.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Direct electronic measurement of the spin Hall effect

              The generation, manipulation and detection of spin-polarized electrons in nanostructures define the main challenges of spin-based electronics[1]. Amongst the different approaches for spin generation and manipulation, spin-orbit coupling, which couples the spin of an electron to its momentum, is attracting considerable interest. In a spin-orbit-coupled system, a nonzero spin-current is predicted in a direction perpendicular to the applied electric field, giving rise to a "spin Hall effect"[2-4]. Consistent with this effect, electrically-induced spin polarization was recently detected by optical techniques at the edges of a semiconductor channel[5] and in two-dimensional electron gases in semiconductor heterostructures[6,7]. Here we report electrical measurements of the spin-Hall effect in a diffusive metallic conductor, using a ferromagnetic electrode in combination with a tunnel barrier to inject a spin-polarized current. In our devices, we observe an induced voltage that results exclusively from the conversion of the injected spin current into charge imbalance through the spin Hall effect. Such a voltage is proportional to the component of the injected spins that is perpendicular to the plane defined by the spin current direction and the voltage probes. These experiments reveal opportunities for efficient spin detection without the need for magnetic materials, which could lead to useful spintronics devices that integrate information processing and data storage.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Physics
                Journal of Applied Physics
                AIP Publishing
                0021-8979
                1089-7550
                May 15 2011
                May 15 2011
                : 109
                : 10
                : 103913
                Article
                10.1063/1.3587173
                © 2011
                Product

                Comments

                Comment on this article